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    #1

    Like

    Like humans apes walk.

    I believe the following is true about the sentence above:

    1. "Like" can not be a noun since "humans" and "apes" are nouns
    2. "Like" can not be a adjective since "humans apes" is not a compund noun.
    3. "Like" can not be a adverb since "humans" is a noun.
    4. "like" can not be a verb since "walk" is the verb.

    Why can "Like" not be a interjection?
    Is it because "humans" is a plural noun?

    This means "like" must be a preposition.
    Is this analysis correct?


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    #2

    Re: Like

    Like humans apes walk.
    You don't have to go the roundabout way. The sentence "Like humans(,) apes walk." is actually, "Apes walk like humans."

    Grammatical analysis of the above sentence:
    Apes----n. subject
    walk-----verb
    like----preposition
    humans ------ n. object of the preposition.

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    #3

    Re: Like

    So then why is "like" not a interjection in that sentence?


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    #4

    Re: Like

    So then why is "like" not a interjection in that sentence?
    Can you tell me a reason why it is an "interjection"??

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    #5

    Re: Like

    I think that, in this instance, like is an adjective meaning bearing a resemblence or similarity to.

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    #6

    Re: Like

    Temico, I know that "like" is not being used as an interjection in that sentence. What I want to know is HOW do I know this?


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    #7

    Re: Like

    I know that "like" is not being used as an interjection in that sentence.
    notinmyname, can you give a sentence example where "like" is used as an interjection?

    Please read the site << http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/dur.../gramch26.html >> Chapter 26. Prepositions

    Roll down to the preposition "like" and you will see the following explanations and examples:-
    quote:

    Like
    1. Resembling: That looks like him.
    2. Appearing possible: It looks like rain.
    3. Be in a suitable mood for: I feel like going swimming.

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    #8

    Re: Like

    StillLearning, can you give a sentence example where "like" is used as an interjection?
    Temico, Here is one:

    He was, like, gorgeous.


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    #9

    Re: Like

    He was, like, gorgeous.
    "Interjection" I see none, but improper sentence I see one, I am sad to say.

    How about this:-

    Q: Why did you blast her?
    A: She was .....umm...er......talking bull. ( "ummm" and "erh" express hesitation and are considered "interjections")
    << http://www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/interjections.htm >>
    Last edited by Temico; 29-Sep-2005 at 20:49.

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    #10

    Re: Like

    "Interjection" I see none, but improper sentence I see one, I am sad to say.
    I got that example from the Merriam-Webster dictionary.

    Here is the complete reference:
    3 b -- used interjectionally in informal speech often to emphasize a word or phrase (as in "He was, like, gorgeous") or for an apologetic, vague, or unassertive effect (as in "I need to, like, borrow some money")
    Last edited by notmyname216; 29-Sep-2005 at 19:25.

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