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    #1

    the best/ best

    Which jacket do you like the best/ best?

    Is it fine with either of "the best and best"? Please.
    Last edited by puzzle; 22-Aug-2011 at 12:01.

  1. Mylanguageclick's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: the best/ best

    I would be more likely to say, "I like it best." (rather than "the best.") "I like it most/best" / "Which pop group do you like best?.
    Regards.

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    #3

    Re: the best/ best

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    Which jacket do you like the best/ best?

    Is it fine with either of "the best and best"? Please.
    Yes, you can use either.

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    #4

    Re: the best/ best

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    Which jacket do you like the best/ best?

    Is it fine with either of "the best and best"? Please.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (1) I have also often asked myself this question. I am glad to see that

    the two teachers have told us that we may use either form.

    (2) I checked my books and the Web, and I found some information to share

    with you:

    (a) The great grammarian George O. Curme says that the "normal" form is the one without

    the. He gives these examples:

    He lives nearest to us./ John worked hardest./ He stayed longest.

    (b) Professor Curme says that the other form is "quite common in colloquial

    speech [the way ordinary people speak] and occurs sometimes in the literary

    literature [books written by good authors]." He gives these examples:

    Of all my books, I like this the best./ He was the greatest patriot in their eyes

    who brawled the loudest./ Great souls are they who love the most.

    (c) The professor wrote that more than 70 years ago in his masterpiece A Grammar of

    the English Language. Nowadays is the "normal" form the one with "the"?

    (d) I then checked the Web. It seems to me that most American websites suggest

    that it is preferable to use the "the form." For example, fortunecity. com gives these

    examples:

    He jumped + the + highest + of all the boys in the class.
    Our team plays +the + best + of all the teams in the league.

    Maybe we could analyze your sentence as:

    Which jacket do you like + the + best + of all the jackets that you own?

    (e) I have now decided that in the future, I am going to use the "the + adverb" form.

    I think that most Americans prefer that form.

    (f) IMPORTANT: Michael Swan in his hugely popular Practical English Usage

    reminds us that there is one time when we may not use the: when we compare the

    same person. Therefore, we may NOT use "the" in these sentences:

    He's nicest when he has had a few drinks.

    She works hardest when she is doing something for her family.

    (ONLY my example) I do best in class when I respect the teacher because of her knowledge, patience, and kindness.

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