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    #1

    a long shot

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    “This is going to be very though and a very long shot,” he said. “I want that fully understood…”
    “You are perfectly right to emphasize the risk, Captain. We fully accept that.” (A. Halley and J. Castle, “Runway Zero-Eight”)

    a long shot = a risky enterprise, a brave attempt

    V.

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    #2

    Re: a long shot

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    “This is going to be very though and a very long shot,” he said. “I want that fully understood…”
    “You are perfectly right to emphasize the risk, Captain. We fully accept that.” (A. Halley and J. Castle, “Runway Zero-Eight”)

    a long shot = a risky enterprise, a brave attempt

    V.
    Hi,

    long shot means one has a very slight chance of winning.

    Thanks,
    Aishwarya

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    #3

    Re: a long shot

    Hi Aishwarya.89,

    You are perfectly right alluding to the other connotation of the expression in question:

    a long shot = an off-chance, something that is not promising

    But there was something he could check. It was a long shot, but all that was needed was a phone call. (A. Hailey, “Airport”)

    Thank you again for you kindness.

    V.

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    #4

    Re: a long shot

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Hi Aishwarya.89,

    You are perfectly right alluding to the other connotation of the expression in question:

    a long shot = an off-chance, something that is not promising
    I think Aishwarya is close to the central meaning, not the 'other' connotation. ALD gives "an attempt or a guess that is not likely to be successful but it's worth trying." If the lack of success could have a negative effect, which it often does, risk is involved. So, 'a risky enterprise' may be part of the implied meaning, but only in the right context. 'A brave attempt' is rather different, though it may be applicable to a long shot.

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