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    #1

    quit for the day

    If I was at a party and didn't feel like drinking anymore, could I say "I think I'm going to quit for the day."?

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    #2

    Re: quit for the day

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    If I was at a party and didn't feel like drinking anymore, could I say "I think I'm going to quit for the day."?
    Sure.

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    #3

    Re: quit for the day

    Quote Originally Posted by billmcd View Post
    Sure.
    Can I use it when something stops working?

    "I need to get my car serviced. I wnat to make sure it doesn't quit a few miles down the road."

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: quit for the day

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Can I use it when something stops working?

    "I need to get my car serviced. I wnat to make sure it doesn't quit a few miles down the road."
    In BrE, no, but I have a feeling it's probably OK in AmE. I'm sure someone will confirm or deny.

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    #5

    Re: quit for the day

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    In BrE, no, but I have a feeling it's probably OK in AmE. I'm sure someone will confirm or deny.
    Could I as well use it to mean "leave a place where I live" "We have to quit the hotel before 12 a.m.?

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    #6

    Re: quit for the day

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Could I as well use it to mean "leave a place where I live" "We have to quit the hotel before 12 a.m.?
    "Quit" for stops working or for ending an activity is OK, but don't strech its use too far as in your "quit the hotel" which you mean "to exit".

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: quit for the day

    In (informal) British Eng a car 'conks out'. Sometimes, to emphasize the impact on the driver, you may hear something like 'That useless car of yours only went and conked out on me just around the corner.'

    b

    PS if it conks out in a spectacular manner (lots of steam/smoke/noise) it can also be said to have 'blown up'. ''Blow' is often used of a http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gasket .
    Last edited by BobK; 27-Aug-2011 at 18:48. Reason: PS Added

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    #8

    Re: quit for the day

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    In (informal) British Eng a car 'conks out'. Sometimes, to emphasize the impact on the driver, you may hear something like 'That useless car of yours only went and conked out on me just around the corner.'

    b

    PS if it conks out in a spectacular manner (lots of steam/smoke/noise) it can also be said to have 'blown up'. ''Blow' is often used of a Gasket - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia .
    Would "conk out" be typical of BE only?

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    #9

    Re: quit for the day

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    Yes, this is used in the US. I don't want the car to quit or cease functioning. You could use "quit" to mean to leave or to stop using, though in some cases, it would be rather dated - "I shall quit this place forever."
    Could I use to mean "vacate a room" in a hotel?

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: quit for the day

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Could I use to mean "vacate a room" in a hotel?
    Not in modern usage, no.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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