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    #1

    the doggy bag

    What does the doggy bag mean in terms of asking for leftover food to be boxed or wraped up? Would it be any kind of bag or plastic bag used for it?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: the doggy bag

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    What does the doggy bag mean in terms of asking for leftover food to be boxed or wraped up? Would it be any kind of bag or plastic bag used for it?
    Each individual restaurant uses whatever container it likes. Sometimes you'll be given your leftovers in a bag, sometimes a plastic box, a cardboard box, a paper bag, a tin box with a paper lid etc.

    You don't specify what you want it in. You just say "Can I have a doggy bag please?" They will bring your food to you in whatever container they choose.

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: the doggy bag

    In the US, the portions of food served at restaurants have become so large that it is very common for a diner not to finish his meal. The server will usually ask something like "Do you need any boxes?" or "Are we taking anything home?" or something similar to indicate that you want your leftover food packaged so that you can take it home.

    Most US restaurants will place your leftovers in a styrofoam container (colloquially called a "box" in the restaurant business). Even when such leftovers were still referred to as "doggy bags", the food was first placed into another container - often a styrofoam box - and then slipped into a paper bag with comical cartoons and notations like "Food for Fido." But the actual food was never placed into a plastic or paper bag without being packaged in some other type of wrapper or container first.

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    #4

    Re: the doggy bag

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    In the US, the portions of food served at restaurants have become so large that it is very common for a diner not to finish his meal. The server will usually ask something like "Do you need any boxes?" or "Are we taking anything home?" or something similar to indicate that you want your leftover food packaged so that you can take it home.

    Most US restaurants will place your leftovers in a styrofoam container (colloquially called a "box" in the restaurant business). Even when such leftovers were still referred to as "doggy bags", the food was first placed into another container - often a styrofoam box - and then slipped into a paper bag with comical cartoons and notations like "Food for Fido." But the actual food was never placed into a plastic or paper bag without being packaged in some other type of wrapper or container first.
    Would it be OK , if I wanted to get leftover food boxed, to say "I need a doggy bag please" or " Can I have a doggy bag please" or "Can you get me a doggy bag please"?
    Last edited by ostap77; 28-Aug-2011 at 00:23.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: the doggy bag

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Would it be OK , if I wanted to get leftover food boxed, to say "I need a doggy dag please" or " Can I have a doggy bag please" or "Can you get me a doggy bag please"?
    You could, but modern usage is "Could you box this for me please?" or "Could I get this boxed please?"
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: the doggy bag

    I a not sure how common a usage it is, but I have heard doggy bag used as a verb- could you doggy bag that, please.

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    #7

    Re: the doggy bag

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Would it be OK , if I wanted to get leftover food boxed, to say "I need a doggy bag please" or " Can I have a doggy bag please" or "Can you get me a doggy bag please"?
    These are all OK. You could also just ask the server, "Could you wrap this, please?" As Ouisch has pointed out, the server will frequently suggest it. BTW, both Barb and Ouisch mentioned "boxes;" I've never heard this before. There must be regional differences even regarding doggy bags.

  5. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: the doggy bag

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    I've heard both versions but, at least in the western US, "box" is not common. The bottom line is that the dog probably never gets the food anyway.
    I made the mistake of one time giving Trailways, my beloved greyhound, the leftovers from a carry-out box when we came home one night. For the rest of his life, every time we entered the house with a carry-out container he did a "happy dance" and wagged his tail so fiercely that it swept the coffee table clear. I always told Mr. Ouisch "Look how happy Trai is to see us!" Mr. Ouisch would reply "Are you kidding? He's thinking 'Box! I love you! You came home to me delicious box!'" Of course, during the 11 years we had Trai Mr. Ouisch and I always ended up relinquishing our doggy bags to him.....who could resist those huge, pleading eyes, big ol' greyhound smile and waggy tail??

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    #9

    Re: the doggy bag

    You named your greyhound Trailways? I love it!

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    #10

    Re: the doggy bag

    Smart dog, and quite right too- after all who should get the doggy bag, but Trailways?

    And that is a great name.

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