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    #1

    Interpretation of an short phrase.

    This is a phrase in a medieval novel.

    "lady Audrey will come get you. You eat a good breakfast, now."

    It's a phrase an chambermaid said to a guest. I'm now puzzling how do I interpret this second line. I feel it too descriptive as an conversation.

    I suppose it may mean "You can eat" or be suggestion from context. Is there such an expression, too? May someone help me out?

  1. AlainK
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    #2

    Re: Interpretation of an short phrase.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nanatuha
    This is a phrase in a medieval novel.

    "lady Audrey will come get you. You eat a good breakfast, now."

    It's a phrase an chambermaid said to a guest. I'm now puzzling how do I interpret this second line. I feel it too descriptive as an conversation.

    I suppose it may mean "You can eat" or be suggestion from context. Is there such an expression, too? May someone help me out?
    Not being a native, but largely a self-taught grammarian (help welcome) this is how I would interpret it:
    simple present=fact -> it's a statement, not to be discussed because self-evident

    The chambermaid here has a motherly attitude in spite of the different social status, she knows what's best for the guest.

    The fact that she uses the adjective "good" is another indication of this role-play : she gives an order, but at the same time she appeals to the common sense of the guest, the way a mother would tell her child "you're a big boy now" (you know what's good for you).



    AK

  2. SweetMommaSue's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Interpretation of an short phrase.

    Here's my two cents:

    The first part of the sentence is a declarative statement. She is merely stating that at some time soon in the future, Lady Audrey will be picking up the guest. The second part of the sentence is a "mothering" tone and as such is an imperative statement, a command that is softened in tone by the use of "good". The maid seems to be comforting the guest and telling him/her to go eat a hearty breakfast as there is plenty of time.

    This is how I understand it without the preceding or proceeding context.

    • Member Info
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    #4

    Re: Interpretation of an short phrase.

    I see. I understood very well.

    Now think of that, the maid serves to a wizard like predictor in the novel and also said something like "When you meet the master, you will no longer wonder". so I'm sure the interpretation is correct.

    Alaink, SweetMommaSue, I thank for your help.

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