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    #1

    want

    I wonder if there is any difference between "1" and "2".
    1. I don't want you to sit around.
    2. I don't want you sitting around.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: want

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I wonder if there is any difference between "1" and "2".
    1. I don't want you to sit around.
    2. I don't want you sitting around.
    There is no real difference in meaning.

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    #3

    Re: want

    Where both the infinitive and the participle form are admitted, several factors influence the choice.
    The infinitive is biased towards potentiality and is therefore favoured in hypothetical and nonfactual contexts, whereas the participle is favoured in factual contexts.

    In keeping with this,

    I don't want you to sit around.

    suggests that the hearer is not sitting around now but (s)he might be in the future, which the spoeaker does not want.

    -----------------

    I don't want you sitting around.

    Factual. The referent of you is sitting around, which idea the speaker does not particularly favour.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: want

    Quote Originally Posted by Afit View Post
    Where both the infinitive and the participle form are admitted, several factors influence the choice.
    The infinitive is biased towards potentiality and is therefore favoured in hypothetical and nonfactual contexts, whereas the participle is favoured in factual contexts.

    In keeping with this,

    I don't want you to sit around.

    suggests that the hearer is not sitting around now but (s)he might be in the future, which the spoeaker does not want. Not necessarily.

    -----------------

    I don't want you sitting around.

    Factual. The referent of you is sitting around, which idea the speaker does not particularly favour. Not necessarily.
    .

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    #5

    Re: want

    Not necessarily.
    Agreed.

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