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    #1

    Question sucked / squeezed orange

    Dear Teachers,

    do you know such idiomatic expressions as "sucked orange" or "squeezed orange"? Are they commom in English, if they exist at all? And what they mean?

    Thank you in advance!

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: sucked / squeezed orange

    Quote Originally Posted by Phantomkin1 View Post
    Dear Teachers,

    do you know such idiomatic expressions as "sucked orange" or "squeezed orange"? Are they commom in English, if they exist at all? And what they mean?

    Thank you in advance!
    "squeezed orange(s)" is common. I have never come across "sucked orange".

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    #3

    Re: sucked / squeezed orange

    But I know it only as a literal idea (i.e., freshly made orange juice) not as an idiomatic one.

    Phantomkin1 - welcome to the forums, by the way, but what is the idiomatic meaning you intend?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #4

    Question Re: sucked / squeezed orange

    In the English-Lithuanian dictionary there are two English idioms: sucked orange (means "totally exhausted man") and squeezed orange ("person/thing not useful anymore"), but I can't find them in any dictionary of contemporary English (including almighty google). I always though that "clockwork orange" or "annoying orange" (some very funny cartoon I've recently discovered on youtube) are based on these idioms, but now I have doubts...

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: sucked / squeezed orange

    Quote Originally Posted by Phantomkin1 View Post
    In the English-Lithuanian dictionary there are two English idioms: sucked orange (means "totally exhausted man") and squeezed orange ("person/thing not useful anymore"),
    I'm sorry, but I'm completely unaware of these idioms. Perhaps they are used in the UK or in other English-speaking countries.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. Amigos4's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: sucked / squeezed orange

    Enjoy yourself while you are in Lithuania! You won't be sucking or squeezing many oranges when you visit the United States!

    Of course, I am going for the quick chuckle here!!! I have never heard these idioms used in the US.

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    #7

    Re: sucked / squeezed orange

    I have seen a sucked orange used idiomatically in that way- it was used in the title of an album that recycled old songs. It's the only usage I can think of, and it's a pretty obscure one.

    (A Sucked Orange by Nurse with Wound.
    Titles like Pleasant Banjo Intro With Irritating Squeak, A Precise History Of Industrial Music or the inimitable Musical Bovine Spongiform (The Mad Cow Two-Step) may give you an idea of the delights in store)

    Other than that, I have never come across it.
    Last edited by Tdol; 07-Sep-2011 at 06:03.

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    #8

    Re: sucked / squeezed orange

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I'm sorry, but I'm completely unaware of these idioms. Perhaps they are used in the UK or in other English-speaking countries.
    Until I read Tdol's post #7, I would have responded 'never' As he noted, it's pretty obscure.

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    #9

    Re: sucked / squeezed orange

    Maybe Nurse with Wound are popular among Lithuanian lexicographers.
    Last edited by Tdol; 07-Sep-2011 at 07:07.

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