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  1. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #1

    To cover for something

    Note that a safety plan should always be in place, which covers for the highly unlikely event that the sub will not be able to make its way to the surface independently.
    Can someone help me interpreting this sentence? To what word does "which" refer? Does it refer to the "safety plan".

    It seems to me that they're trying to say that the safety plan should tell them what do to in such a unlikely event. That is what "cover for" means.

    Am I right?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: To cover for something

    Quote Originally Posted by Chicken Sandwich View Post
    Can someone help me interpreting this sentence? To what word does "which" refer? Does it refer to the "safety plan".

    It seems to me that they're trying to say that the safety plan should tell them what do to in such a unlikely event. That is what "cover for" means.

    Am I right?

    Thanks in advance.
    It's a badly written sentence.

  3. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: To cover for something

    Thanks. So there's no way that you can decipher what they could mean?

    I couldn't find the phrasel verb cover for something in my dictionary, only cover for somebody.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: To cover for something

    "Cover for" makes no sense here. "Cover" would have been better.

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