Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 49
    #1

    to bathe (or not to bathe :) ?)

    I have a question

    I am translating a sentence :

    "The patient will bathe at least every other day while in hospital"

    does the verb "bathe" include "takng a shower" or only "taking a bath in a bathtub" ?

    it is about psychiatric patients with bipolar disorder, guidelines for nurses

    the dictionaries say only "take a bath", but it would be unhygienic ina hospital, wouldn't it?

    Thank you for any help

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,893
    #2

    Re: to bathe (or not to bathe :) ?)

    Quote Originally Posted by alla View Post
    I have a question

    I am translating a sentence :

    "The patient will bathe at least every other day while in hospital"

    does the verb "bathe" include "takng a shower" or only "taking a bath in a bathtub" ?

    it is about psychiatric patients with bipolar disorder, guidelines for nurses

    the dictionaries say only "take a bath", but it would be unhygienic ina hospital, wouldn't it?

    Thank you for any help
    It doesn't specify but "to bathe" to me would simply mean to "wash one's body", regardless of whether it's in a bathtub or a shower. It would be better if it said "The patient will bath or shower every other day..." (note that I used "to bath" as a verb instead of "bathe")

    There is nothing unhygienic about taking a bath, and it's probably quite common in some hospitals. Most will have showers but perhaps bipolar patients have specific needs. I imagine that a nice calm bath might be good for someone in a manic phase of their bipolar disorder.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 49
    #3

    Re: to bathe (or not to bathe :) ?)

    Thank you very much for your explanation, emsr2d2

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 4,142
    #4

    Re: to bathe (or not to bathe :) ?)

    Quote Originally Posted by alla View Post
    I have a question

    I am translating a sentence :

    "The patient will bathe at least every other day while in hospital"

    does the verb "bathe" include "takng a shower" or only "taking a bath in a bathtub" ?

    it is about psychiatric patients with bipolar disorder, guidelines for nurses

    the dictionaries say only "take a bath", but it would be unhygienic ina hospital, wouldn't it?

    Thank you for any help
    Yes, "bathe" can refer to washing in a bathtub or in a shower, or even lying in bed and having the nurse give you a sponge bath.

    I don't know whether a "bath" would be unhygienic unless the staff didn't take the time to scrub down the entire bathtub after each use. Medical personnel are busy enough, a thorough tub scrub would take a lot more time than cleaning the floor of a shower stall.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,502
    #5

    Re: to bathe (or not to bathe :) ?)

    In BE at least the word bathe is rather formal and is rarely used colloquially.

    We say

    'I have a bath every week, whether I need it or not.'

    'You smell. Go and have a bath.'

    'She baths her baby every day'.

    We reserve bathe for more delicate and localised irrigation purposes:

    'I have an eye infection and need to bathe them three times a day' (though confusingly I use an eye bath to do this).

    'We'll bathe his frost-bitten toes in tepid water.'

    Unfortunately the past tense and participle of both verbs is spelt bathed, so the context has to determine which pronunciation is appropriate.

    Rover
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 06-Sep-2011 at 08:41.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 49
    #6

    Re: to bathe (or not to bathe :) ?)

    Thanks for all the answers
    By the way, this is an American text

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,502
    #7

    Re: to bathe (or not to bathe :) ?)

    Quote Originally Posted by alla View Post
    By the way, this is an American text
    In this case, alla, that piece of information is of no importance, but in future posts please tell us at the very beginning as that fact may affect our replies.

    Rover

Similar Threads

  1. bath/bathe
    By blouen in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 13-Jul-2007, 08:44
  2. Rain Bathe
    By carla guaraldi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Mar-2006, 09:26

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •