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    #1

    with a year's notice

    "In 2010, Southeastern Louisiana University eliminated its undergraduate French major, dismissing its three tenured professors with a year's notice- and then offering one of them a temporary instructorship."

    Does it mean they were warned that they were going to be dismissed before they were actually fired? I've heard people use both "at an hour's notice" and "on an hour's notice". So I take it I can also say "with an hour's notice"?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: with a year's notice

    Yes, they were told a full year in advance that there position was being eliminated.

    (Note: I wouldn't used "fired" in this example. The people didn't do anything wrong, which is implied by "fired." They were laid off, let go, or more accurately, as I said above, their position was eliminated.)

    You can do things with an hour's notice, yes. A day's notice. A week's notice.

    It's common in the US that when you leave a job, you give your employer two weeks' notice. That allows for an orderly transition of your projects to other people. Of course, if you are going to a competing organization, they may not want you to work those two weeks. They tell you to just stay home.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 06-Sep-2011 at 16:51.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: with a year's notice

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Yes, they were told a full year in advance that there position was being eliminated.

    (Note: I wouldn't used "fired" in this example. The people didn't do anything wrong, which is implied by "fired." They were laid off, let go, or more accurately, as I said above, their position was eliminated.)

    You can do things with an hour's notice, yes. A day's notice. A week's notice.

    It's common in the US that when you leave a job, you give your employer two weeks' notice. That allows for an orderly transition of your projects to other people. Of course, if you are going to a competing organization, they may not want you to work those two weeks. They tell you to just stay home.
    Is it two weak's notice or a two weeks' notice? Would there be the difference between the use of prepositions "at","on" or "with"?
    Last edited by ostap77; 07-Sep-2011 at 09:16.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: with a year's notice

    NB: week, not weak.

    A two-week notice.
    Two weeks' notice.

    Could you give me sentences you want to see the prepositions in?

    I can deploy for a month with a two-day notice.
    I can deploy for a month with two days' notice.

    I gave my employer my two weeks' notice today.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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