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    #1

    "It's very in." Grammatically correct?

    Hi All,

    I'd like to know the phrase of "It's very in.", is it grammatically correct in English? and is it an idiomatic expression?

    Regards,

    EngFan

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    #2

    Re: "It's very in." Grammatically correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by EngFan View Post
    Hi All,

    I'd like to know the phrase of "It's very in.", is it grammatically correct in English? and is it an idiomatic expression?

    Regards,

    EngFan
    Tennis:
    I won that point, I am telling you! The ball was definitely in! It was very in.

    -------

    "It is very in" is not very natural and I think people do not often say it.

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    #3

    Re: "It's very in." Grammatically correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by EngFan View Post
    Hi All,

    I'd like to know the phrase of "It's very in.", is it grammatically correct in English? and is it an idiomatic expression?

    Regards,

    EngFan

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Some years back, this was a popular phrase here in the United States:

    Mona: Do you like my new hat?

    Martha: It's divine, darling!

    Mona: It's very/quite in, you know.

    Martha: Oh, yes, I know that it is very fashionable/popular right now.

    Mona: Shall we have lunch at the Parser Cafe?

    Martha: Let's do, darling. I hear that the Parser Cafe is the in place to eat and to

    be seen.


    ***

    In the year 2011, I do not think that this phrase is still very in. But I am not sure, since

    I am an old man who doesn't get out much. Maybe a fellow American can further

    inform us.

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    #4

    Re: "It's very in." Grammatically correct?

    I learnt something new today. Thank you, TheParser!

  1. suprunp's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "It's very in." Grammatically correct?

    TheParser, do you use 'out' as an antonym?
    As in:
    "Long skirts are out at the moment."

    Thanks.

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    #6

    Re: "It's very in." Grammatically correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by suprunp View Post
    TheParser, do you use 'out' as an antonym?
    As in:
    "Long skirts are out at the moment."

    Thanks.
    This year pink is definitely out.

    out - definition. American English definition of out by Macmillan Dictionary

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    #7

    Re: "It's very in." Grammatically correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by suprunp View Post
    TheParser, do you use 'out' as an antonym?
    As in:
    "Long skirts are out at the moment."

    Thanks.


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) According to my dictionary, you are 100% correct.

    (2) But I think (repeat: think) that the expression "it's out" is no longer in!!!


    P.S. Your sentence could mean something different. That is, we do not have

    any long skirts in the store "at the moment," but we are getting a new supply of

    those skirts next week. I imagine that if you are using "out" as no longer fashionable,

    you would say something like "I would not be caught dead wearing long skirts. They

    are definitely out."

    P.P. S. I have just remembered: some people now say something like:

    It's 2011, so why are you still wearing your hair in that style? It's so 2010,

    my dear!

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: "It's very in." Grammatically correct?

    I agree that out is no longer in. The idiomatic expression (in Br Eng at least) is 'It's so "last year"'.

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