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    #1

    Using IN and ON

    What is the correct usage of IN and ON in a sentence.

    Thank you.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Using IN and ON

    Quote Originally Posted by Engrd View Post
    What is the correct usage of IN and ON in a sentence.

    Thank you.
    There are many different ways to use them, above is a correct use of "in".

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    #3

    Re: Using IN and ON

    Quote Originally Posted by Engrd View Post
    What is the correct usage of IN and ON in a sentence.

    Thank you.

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I believe that there is no "correct" usage.

    (2) It is idiomatic. That is, it depends on what a group of people decide to use.

    (3) Here are some examples that show how "crazy" the situation is:

    (a) In California, we stand in line, but people in New York stand on line.

    (b) In the United States, we live on Maple Street; in England, they live in

    Maple Street.

    (c) Probably, today most Americans say in an elevator; probably most said

    on an elevator back in the days when I was young.

    (d) In the United States, on the street often means on the sidewalk; in

    actually means in the middle of the street.

    (e) In the United States, we ride on the subway but in a subway car (carriage). And

    we say that there are police officers watching for suspicious activity in the subway

    (station).

    (f) You sit in an armchair; you sit on a sofa, bench, stool. If the chair does not

    have arms, some people prefer on a chair while others prefer in.

    (4) As you can see, the situation is "crazy." I suggest that you keep a notebook.

    Write down examples of "in" and "on" that you see in the American and British

    media. Then, little by little, you will start to get an idea of what is "correct."

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