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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
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      • Taiwan
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    #1

    walk around the plane

    I would appreciate it if someone could tell me the difference between the
    following two sentences:
    1) During the flight, you can get up and walk around in the cabin.
    2) During the flight, you can get up and walk around the plane.
    The second sentence does not make sense to me.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Dutch
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      • Europe
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      • Europe

    • Join Date: Jul 2011
    • Posts: 173
    #2

    Re: walk around the plane

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Chung View Post
    2) During the flight, you can get up and walk around the plane.
    The second sentence does not make sense to me.
    Not to me, either, unless you are Superman with the extraordinary ability to walk on air in the literary sense. "around the plane" means along the outer edge, outside.

    EDIT: The sentence is okay with "around" with this meaning:

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dict...ritish/about_5

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: walk around the plane

    The second sentence makes perfect sense. No native speaker would suppose that walking around a plane meant that you had to be outside it.

    around

    Definition
    in a position or direction surrounding, or in a direction going along the edge of or from one part to another
    We sat around the table.
    He put his arm around her.
    A crowd had gathered around the scene of the accident.
    She had a woollen scarf around her neck.
    The moon goes around the Earth.
    I walked around the side of the building.
    As the bus left, she turned around (= so that she was facing in the opposite direction) and waved goodbye to us.
    He put the wheel on the right/wrong way around (= facing the right/wrong way).

    The children were dancing around the room.
    I spent a year travelling around Africa and the Middle East.
    The museum's collection includes works of art from all around the world.
    She passed a plate of biscuits around (= from one person to another).
    This virus has been going around (= from one person to another).

    (Definition of around preposition/adverb (IN THIS DIRECTION) from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary)

    Rover

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