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    #1

    Synthesis

    Everyone thought Tina was the cuplrit. She was innocent.

    1. Despite Tina being innocent, everybody thought that she was the culprit.
    2. Despite being innocent, everyone thought Tina was the culprit.

    Which is the correct sentence in reporting the above sentence in bold? I think it should be 1.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by Tan Elaine; 12-Sep-2011 at 20:01. Reason: typo

  1. Bennevis's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Reported Speech

    Definitely, the 1st sentence.

    In the second sentence, we are not sure who exactly is innocent. Try to avoid doing that.

  2. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Reported Speech

    The structure of your first sentence is commonly heard in informal speech. The genetive, Tina's, or the possessive, her, can also be used with the -ing form. I agree with Bennevis that the second sentence is somewhat ambiguous. Why did you call your thread Reported Speech? The sentences are not reported speech.

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    #4

    Re: Synthesis

    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    The structure of your first sentence is commonly heard in informal speech. The genetive, Tina's, or the possessive, her, can also be used with the -ing form. I agree with Bennevis that the second sentence is somewhat ambiguous. Why did you call your thread Reported Speech? The sentences are not reported speech.
    Thanks, Requecohen. It should be synthesis. What a blunder!I have corrected the title of the topic.
    Last edited by Tan Elaine; 12-Sep-2011 at 06:56. Reason: wrong title of question

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    #5

    Re: Synthesis

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post

    1. Despite Tiny being innocent, everybody thought that she was the culprit.
    2. Despite being innocent, everyone thought Tina was the culprit.


    Thanks.
    When a subject is not present in a nonfinite or verbless clause, the normal
    ATTACHMENT RULE for identifying the subject is that it is assumed to be
    identical in reference to the subject of the superordinate clause.

    The OP's second sentence is about Tina's (and not everyone's) innocence. In the participle clause, the writer obviously means and the reader obviously assumes Tina to be the implied subject. In the matrix clause (the part after the comma), however, the overt subject is "everyone". There is no match in reference between the two subjects, which results in a bad sentence.
    The problem with sentence 2 is not ambiguity but the breach of attachment rule. Dangling participle.

    The attachment rule does not apply, or at least is relaxed, in certain cases. They do not concern sentence 2; even so, you might be interested.

    1. The clause is a style disjunct, in which case the implied subject
    is the subject of the implied clause of speaking, normally I:
    To be honest, you have caused us some inconvenience.

    2. The implied subject is the whole of the matrix clause:
    I'll help if necessary.

    3. If the implied subject is an indefinite pronoun or prop it:
    Being Christmas, the shops are closed.

    4. In formal scientific writing, the construction has become institutionalized
    where the implied subject is to be identified with the I, we, and you of the
    writer:
    When treating patients with language retardation and deviation of
    language development, the therapy consists, in part, of discussions of
    the patient's problems with parents and teachers, with subsequent
    language teaching carried out by them.

    Quirk et al., 1985

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    #6

    Re: Synthesis

    Thanks, Afit

    3. If the implied subject is an indefinite pronoun or prop it:
    Being Christmas, the shops are closed.

    With due respect to the author, shouldn't sentence 3 above quoted by you read as folllows?

    It being Christmas, the shops are closed.

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    #7

    Re: Synthesis

    Could someone please help? Thanks.

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    #8

    Re: Synthesis

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    3. If the implied subject is an indefinite pronoun or prop it:
    Being Christmas, the shops are closed.

    With due respect to the author, shouldn't sentence 3 above quoted by you read as folllows?

    It being Christmas, the shops are closed.
    No - 'It' is the implied subject': (- 'Since it was Christmas...').

    Quirk et al actually say of such examples (with an indefinite pronoun or prop it), "the construction is less objectionable." One could interpret this as implying that it is still objectionable; I do. I prefer your "It being Christmas...".

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