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    #1

    cry off

    "CRY OFF". The dictionary says it means to withdraw from an appointment. Would you be kind enough to show me some examples as to how this phrasal verb is used?

  1. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: cry off

    While this phrasal verb appears in several dictionaries, I have never heard it used. I wonder if it is peculiar to BrE. A phrasal verb with which I am familiar and which has a similar meaning is "to beg off."

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    #3

    Re: cry off

    Quote Originally Posted by yuanmingqing View Post
    "CRY OFF". The dictionary says it means to withdraw from an appointment. Would you be kind enough to show me some examples as to how this phrasal verb is used?

    ATTENTION: NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I, too, have never heard "cry off."

    (2) I believe that one would cancel a doctor's appointment.

    (3) I believe that for a social engagement, one might say:


    Tom: I'm sorry, Mona, but I have call off our date for Saturday. My boss wants me to do something for him.

    Mona: But I have already bought a new dress for the dance.

    Tom: Sorry, sweetie, but these are hard economic times. My boss comes first.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: cry off

    "Mary said she'd come on the sailing trip with me, but she cried off at the last minute." 'Cry off' = 'back out', 'withdraw', 'cancel'; That's fine in BrE.

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    #5

    Re: cry off

    Here are some examples from the press.

    They are mostly British.

    Rover

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