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    #1

    Question 'to pull a runner'

    Hello,

    what is the meaning of 'pull a runner'? The sentences is:

    Hopefully, he hasnít pulled a runner already.
    It is from this article about an altercation with a foreigner on a bus in Korea.

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: 'to pull a runner'

    Quote Originally Posted by Olympian View Post
    Hello,

    what is the meaning of 'pull a runner'? The sentences is:
    Hopefully, he hasnít pulled a runner already.
    It is from this article about an altercation with a foreigner on a bus in Korea.

    Thank you.

    REMINDER: NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I, too, read about this incident in my local newspaper.

    (2) But the article did not contain the phrase "to pull a runner."

    (3) So I googled and discovered this:

    It appears that in the country that you mentioned, there are sometimes disagreements

    between local employers and people they hire from other countries. Sometimes those

    foreign employees "pull a runner." That is, they just leave their work and often that

    country.

    (a) So I guess your quotation means something like: If he has left his job, we will not

    be able to contact him; if he has left the country, we will not be able to do anything

    about his behavior.

    P.S. This is strictly a language website. So I am not allowed to comment on the

    facts of the case. If I did, a moderator would delete my opinion.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 'to pull a runner'

    I know the expression as 'do a runner'.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: 'to pull a runner'

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I know the expression as 'do a runner'.
    Me too.

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    #5

    Re: 'to pull a runner'

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    REMINDER: NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I, too, read about this incident in my local newspaper.

    (2) But the article did not contain the phrase "to pull a runner."

    (3) So I googled and discovered this:

    It appears that in the country that you mentioned, there are sometimes disagreements

    between local employers and people they hire from other countries. Sometimes those

    foreign employees "pull a runner." That is, they just leave their work and often that

    country.

    (a) So I guess your quotation means something like: If he has left his job, we will not

    be able to contact him; if he has left the country, we will not be able to do anything

    about his behavior.

    P.S. This is strictly a language website. So I am not allowed to comment on the

    facts of the case. If I did, a moderator would delete my opinion.
    @TheParser, thank you for your response. The phrase appears in the blog, I think as a part of an update by the blogger, and it is not a part of the news story. I had also done a quick search but I seem to have missed out on the sites that talk about this phrase.

    I understand you cannot comment about the facts here. If you don't mind, you could send me a PM about it, or you could perhaps use one of the other forums if that is appropriate.

    @fivejedjon and bhaisahab, 'to pull a/an...' seems to be an Americanism. For example, 'to pull an OJ', whereas in BrE, you might say it as 'to do an OJ'. (Not sure if I am right.)

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    #6

    Re: 'to pull a runner'

    [QUOTE=Olympian;800684]

    I understand you cannot comment about the facts here. If you don't mind, you could send me a PM about it, or you could perhaps use one of the other forums if that is appropriate.


    REMINDER: NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Thank you for your thoughtful note.

    (2) In American English, we have the expressions "I would not touch that with a

    ten-foot pole" and "That's a hot potato."

    (a) They refer to a topic that is super controversial.

    (3) So I would never discuss certain topics even in a so-called private message

    or in one of the members-only forum. When you live in the United States, you learn

    to keep very quiet regarding certain topics. I imagine that every country has its

    taboo subjects.

    (4) In fact, I just read something that I wrote down in my notebook of quotations:

    "Whatever is on your mind does not need to be on your lips."

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    #7

    Re: 'to pull a runner'

    Doing a midnight runner is also used for leaving a job without giving any notice.

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    #8

    Re: 'to pull a runner'

    Quote Originally Posted by Olympian View Post
    [B]
    I understand you cannot comment about the facts here. If you don't mind, you could send me a PM about it, or you could perhaps use one of the other forums if that is appropriate.
    I read the story and wouldn't be able to comment on the facts because I don't speak Korean and don't know the issues involved in this particular case. I do know that it is a very sensitive topic for both sides, and the insensitivity displayed in some of the comments on the page show that. Ethnic and cultural issues can quickly become inflammatory. In this case, it's probably best to leave it to the Korean legal system to sort it out.

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    #9

    Re: 'to pull a runner'

    [QUOTE=TheParser;800743]
    Quote Originally Posted by Olympian View Post

    [...]
    (3) So I would never discuss certain topics even in a so-called private message

    or in one of the members-only forum. When you live in the United States, you learn

    to keep very quiet regarding certain topics. I imagine that every country has its

    taboo subjects.

    (4) In fact, I just read something that I wrote down in my notebook of quotations:

    "Whatever is on your mind does not need to be on your lips."
    @TheParser, thank you for the quotation. I should have learned that many years ago , but better late than never.

    I understand your reticence (not sure it is the right word) although I am neither in the US not in the country in question (or country concerned - not sure which one is better here). But I am surprised about 'When you live in the United States, you learn
    to keep very quiet regarding certain topics.' Because I think there is complete freedom of speech in the US unlike in countries like China or other authoritarian regimes. Of course, I understand that some views may be controversial, but as long as they are not politically incorrect, I thought it may be OK to express. But the quotation is the ultimate wisdom here because I also know that whatever is said on the Internet stays there pretty much for ever (forever?).

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    #10

    Re: 'to pull a runner'

    [QUOTE=Olympian;801533][QUOTE=TheParser;800743]

    @TheParser, thank you for the quotation. I should have learned that many years ago , but better late than never.

    I understand your reticence (not sure it is the right word)

    REMINDER: NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Yes, the right word is "reticence." Or maybe a better word is fear!

    (2) As this is strictly a language website, my answer shall be brief and

    super discreet:

    Here in the United States there is a considerable amount of freedom of speech

    and the press (media). But there are many things that are either illegal to say

    or not wise to say. Of course, it is better than in "certain" other countries, but

    there are certain topics that are not discussed in public. By the way, I think that

    you are the journalism fan? Am I right? I had better stop before I say something that

    gets deleted. This is an international helpline. So its members have to be careful

    not to hurt the feelings of other members.

    P.S. On a happier note, I hear that newspapers are doing great in India. Here the

    ones in the big cities are losing (young) readers and older readers like me are dying

    off. I hear, however, that small-town newspapers are still doing pretty well.

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