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    #1

    Cool ce

    Hi,

    I read somewhere a date mentioned the following way: 1861-1901 ce. What's the meaning for ce?

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    #2

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    #3

    Re: ce

    Common Era.

    It's a replacement for AD, anno domini, the Year of our Lord in Latin.

    Using CE instead of AD recongizes that not everyone considers the arrival of Jesus on the planet as the year to start our calendars. That said, most people I know still use AD.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #4

    Re: ce

    And we have BCE (Before Common Era) instead of BC (Before Christ).

    An interesting usage is the Wikipedia page for Jesus, which uses both: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus

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