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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    "less is more"

    "Less is more' is the notion that simplicity and clarity lead to good design. Then how is it related to the underlined part "aspiring to ....and order"? Can you explain it?
    Does it mean "you should even control emotions by concrete shapes"? I don't get it!

    ex)The modernist maxim "less is more", coined by architect Meis Van der Rohe in the thirties, is an idea that dates back millenia. Van der Rohe was something of a classicist. The only difference between him and the architects of the fifth and fourth centuries B.C was a sensibility and style born of the machine age.Van der Rohe was an artist of his time, but the fundamental tenets that guided his work were the same as those that governed his ancestors.
    Balance, harmony,and simplicity have long been cornerstones of artistic activity, whether referring to ancient Greeks and Romans or modern Europeans. Aspiring to an emotional and physical equilibrium, which is rational rather than intuitive, means that even abstract compositions made up of cleanly defined geometrical shapes express classicl principles of restraint and order.

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    #2

    Re: "less is more"

    "Less is more"- the 'Less' is less ornamentation, and the 'More' means that, because there is less ornament to distract our eye, we thus respond to the balance, harmony,and simplicity of the design shapes and their relationships(s), making the overall effect asthetically pleasing in a deeper way.

    From your quote: "...compositions made up of cleanly-defined (Less) geometrical shapes express classical principles of restraint and order (More).

  2. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "less is more"

    Quote Originally Posted by J&K Tutoring View Post
    "Less is more"- the 'Less' is less ornamentation, and the 'More' means that, because there is less ornament to distract our eye, we thus respond to the balance, harmony,and simplicity of the design shapes and their relationships(s), making the overall effect asthetically pleasing in a deeper way.

    From your quote: "...compositions made up of cleanly-defined (Less) geometrical shapes express classical principles of restraint and order (More).
    Is it about an artwork or interior design works? So the simpler they are, the easier to comprehend what they mean? Is it what the author is trying to say?

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    #4

    Re: "less is more"

    keannu-
    I believe my response was succinct. If you want to learn more about this fascinating person and his ideas, then there are better authorities than myself, and you (and others) would do well to improve yourself with some research into his work and life.

    This forum is not for spoon-feeding information, but for answering questions about the English language.

    To help you along in your personal quest to learn more, try searching with his full (and correctly spelled) name: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.

    I will answer your question though. You're on the wrong track- right but for the wrong reasons...

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "less is more"

    Quote Originally Posted by J&K Tutoring View Post
    keannu-
    I believe my response was succinct. If you want to learn more about this fascinating person and his ideas, then there are better authorities than myself, and you (and others) would do well to improve yourself with some research into his work and life.

    This forum is not for spoon-feeding information, but for answering questions about the English language.

    To help you along in your personal quest to learn more, try searching with his full (and correctly spelled) name: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.

    I will answer your question though. You're on the wrong track- right but for the wrong reasons...
    You're right, I was too much persistent in my question, I'll try to find in detail in other sources except language related parts. Thank you for your endeavor and kindness.

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