Results 1 to 8 of 8
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2010
    • Posts: 551
    #1

    Deal with Bokks

    According to an English-Chinese dictionary , " deal v.i. 1. 2. buy and sell (followed by with or in).", it seems to me that we can say "The shop deals with books." Am I right?
    Thanks!

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,092
    #2

    Re: Deal with Bokks

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    According to an English-Chinese dictionary , " deal v.i. 1. 2. buy and sell (followed by with or in).", it seems to me that we can say "The shop deals with books." Am I right?
    Thanks!
    "The shop deals in books."

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2010
    • Posts: 551
    #3

    Re: Deal with Books

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    "The shop deals in books."
    According to you , the dictionary here is wrong. Is that so?
    Thank!

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #4

    Re: Deal with Books

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    According to you , the dictionary here is wrong. Is that so?
    Thank!
    Raymott did not say that! His post dealt with the 'buy and sell' meaning of deal, which involves the preposition 'in'.

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #5

    Re: Deal with Books

    As 5jj says, the dictionary entry is right - in that both 'deals in' and 'deals with' are possible in different contexts. The mistake is not the dictionary's. Rather, it is the belief that a dictionary can give reliable meanings regardless of context - this is particularly important with little dictionaries (without much space for contextual guidelines) and those little digital things (which are impressive, but often misleading). The bookseller deals in books; s/he also deals with (among other things) problems.
    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    According to you , the dictionary here is wrong. Is that so?
    Thank!
    b
    Last edited by BobK; 19-Sep-2011 at 10:54. Reason: PS: tweak format

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #6

    Re: Deal with Books

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    the dictionary here is wrong. Is that so?

    REMINDER: NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Moderator Bob has given us learners a very thoughtful answer.

    (2) May I add something that I found in Funk & Wagnalls New Practical Standard

    Dictionary of the English Language (1956):

    To have dealings; do business; trade with a person, or in an article.

    (a) So that is why we might say that a bookstore deals with many publishers and deals in grammar books.
    Last edited by Tdol; 19-Sep-2011 at 11:53. Reason: Quote code fixed

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2010
    • Posts: 551
    #7

    Re: Deal with Books

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    REMINDER: NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Moderator Bob has given us learners a very thoughtful answer.

    (2) May I add something that I found in Funk & Wagnalls New Practical Standard

    Dictionary of the English Language (1956):

    To have dealings; do business; trade with a person, or in an article.

    (a) So that is why we might say that a bookstore deals with many publishers and deals in grammar books.
    Thank all the above teachers who answered my foolish question and please excuse me for not quoting every answering post to express my ffeelings of thanks!

  4. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #8

    Re: Deal with Books

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    Thank all the above teachers who answered my foolish question and please excuse me for not quoting every answering post to express my ffeelings of thanks!
    You're welcome, and it wasn't foolish.

    b

Similar Threads

  1. no deal
    By ARAM in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-May-2009, 15:16
  2. Here is the deal
    By banderas in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-Dec-2008, 23:50
  3. do with or deal with?
    By joham in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-Sep-2008, 01:05
  4. to deal with
    By zoly in forum English Phrasal Verbs
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-Mar-2008, 19:56
  5. cut her a deal = made a deal with her?
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-Mar-2003, 23:28

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •