Results 1 to 3 of 3
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    to have a way with one

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences?

    Oh, yes. I know hes thrilling and exciting and marvelous to look at, and has a way with him that would charm a duck off a pond. (D. Cusack)

    He has brains., Hes personable. When he chooses, he has a way with him. (A. Cronin)

    He was very good-looking and had a way with him. (N. Bell)

    to have a way with one = to be charming, to have a way to approach to somebody

    V.

  1. Amigos4's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 54,914
    #2

    Re: to have a way with one

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences?

    Oh, yes. I know hes thrilling and exciting and marvelous to look at, and has a way with him that would charm a duck off a pond. (D. Cusack)

    He has brains., Hes personable. When he chooses, he has a way with him. (A. Cronin)

    He was very good-looking and had a way with him. (N. Bell)

    to have a way with one = to be charming, to have a way to approach to somebody

    V.
    Hi, Vil!

    In my 'considered opinion', I would also add 'he has a way about him' to my list of similar expressions.

    I would reserve 'he has a way with him' for situations that involve direct interaction with another person or animal. "That dog is usually vicious with strangers but, surprisingly, John appears to have a way with him." "The policeman is known as a tough cop but John has a way with him that allows us to perform our mischief without getting caught!" (There is interaction with a specific dog and a specific policeman)

    "Oh, yes. I know hes thrilling and exciting and marvelous to look at, and has a way about him that would charm a duck off a pond." (There is no specific duck in this instance.)

    To me, there is ambiguity in this expression: "He was very good-looking and had a way with him." (Did his 'good looks' allow him to have his way with another male? Or, was he good looking and have a way about him that made others take notice of him?

    I hope this is helpful to you.

    Cheers,
    A4

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #3

    Re: to have a way with one

    Hi amigos4,

    Thank you for your well-founded remarks.

    Knowing the contents of the mentioned blow link, in defiance of reason, I insist of my more moderate interpretation of the expression in question (to be charming, to have a way of approach to somebody).

    have one's way with: Information from Answers.com

    Thank you again for your kindness.

    I hope you wouldnt think me an irremediable headstrong person.


    I keep on hoping you realize that the adduced sentences in my post above are not my fabrications.


    Regards,

    V.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •