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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    How came that widow in?

    does it make any sense to you guys?

  2. Bennevis's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: How came that widow in?

    It's archaic.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: How came that widow in?

    And it means "How did that widow come in?" or (presumably) "How did she enter?"

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    #4

    Re: How came that widow in?

    Is it possible to change the positon of interrogative phrases like that?
    can anyone give me some examples?
    thanks guys!

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    #5

    Re: How came that widow in?

    Quote Originally Posted by laurinha88 View Post
    Is it possible to change the positon of interrogative phrases like that?
    can anyone give me some examples?
    thanks guys!
    No, not in English as it is spoken today. I can give you examples but they're very old. One comes from Geoffrey Chaucer's The Tale of Melibee.

    Allas, my lord," quod she, "why make ye youreself for to lyk a fool?

    Another comes from William Shakespeare's Much Ado about Nothing.

    What heard you him say else?

    Remember that we would not say these things this way today.

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    #6

    Re: How came that widow in?

    "why make ye youreself for to lyk a fool" you sure that's right? can you translate it?sorry i'm dumb huahauahauh

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    #7

    Re: How came that widow in?

    Quote Originally Posted by laurinha88 View Post
    "why make ye youreself for to lyk a fool" you sure that's right? can you translate it?sorry i'm dumb huahauahauh
    It's not correct today. It is a very old sentence. It's over 600 years old. The language in which it was written is called Middle English. The sentence was translated as follows by Gerard NeCastro:

    "Alas, my lord," she said, "why do you permit yourself to act like such a fool?"

    As you can see it is "do you permit" in the translation, not "permit you". This would be incorrect in present day English.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: How came that widow in?

    Quote Originally Posted by laurinha88 View Post
    "why make ye youreself for to lyk a fool" you sure that's right? can you translate it?sorry i'm dumb huahauahauh
    Oh yes, we're quite sure it's right. If you would like many more examples of Middle English, click HERE

    It will take you to an entire website of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales in the original language. Some of us (of a certain age) were required to study Chaucer for a couple of years at school. I can assure you that the majority of us did not enjoy it!

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: How came that widow in?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Oh yes, we're quite sure it's right. If you would like many more examples of Middle English, click HERE

    It will take you to an entire website of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales in the original language. Some of us (of a certain age) were required to study Chaucer for a couple of years at school. I can assure you that the majority of us did not enjoy it!
    Chaucer was in the English Literature course for GCSE 2009/2010.

  8. BobK's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: How came that widow in?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Oh yes, we're quite sure it's right. If you would like many more examples of Middle English, click HERE

    It will take you to an entire website of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales in the original language. Some of us (of a certain age) were required to study Chaucer for a couple of years at school. I can assure you that the majority of us did not enjoy it!
    Speak for yourself. I enjoyed the first two years so much that I went on for another two!

    b

    PS I'm surprised nobody's mentioned context. A widow isn't always a woman whose husband has died - though that is by far the most common meaning. For example, an editor who has read the galley-proofs of a book might - after page make-up - say 'How did this widow get here?' see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Widow_%28typesetting%29 .
    Last edited by BobK; 21-Sep-2011 at 11:12. Reason: PS added

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