Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. lovecindy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 83
    #1

    Smile twice as heavy as = twice heavier than ?

    Just like what the title says, if A is 10 kg, B is 20kg, can I say B is twice as heavy as A or B is twice heavier than A? Are they both right? Do they have the same meaning?

    Thanks a lot!

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #2

    Re: twice as heavy as = twice heavier than ?

    These are a very clear way to say this:

    B weighs twice what A weighs.
    B's weight is twice that of A's.
    B weighs twice as much as A.

    Focus on the weight, not the "heaviness."
    Last edited by Barb_D; 21-Sep-2011 at 15:03. Reason: Fixed confusing typos!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. lovecindy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 83
    #3

    Smile Re: twice as heavy as = twice heavier than ?

    Yes, I see.
    But could you please tell me, are the expressions of twice as heavy as or twice heavier than correct? And I'd like to know whether they have the same meaning or not. Thank you.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #4

    Re: twice as heavy as = twice heavier than ?

    "Twice heavier" is not grammatical.

    "Twice as heavy" is acceptable, but I feel inferior to referencing the weight.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. lovecindy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 83
    #5

    Smile Re: twice as heavy as = twice heavier than ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    "Twice heavier" is not grammatical.

    "Twice as heavy" is acceptable, but I feel inferior to referencing the weight.
    Thank you very much.
    By the way, the Thanks key is disappearing? I remember there was one at the bottom of the thread.

  6. lovecindy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 83
    #6

    Smile Re: twice as heavy as = twice heavier than ?

    one more question, if I have ten students, you have twenty students, can I say your students are twice more than mine?

  7. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,092
    #7

    Re: twice as heavy as = twice heavier than ?

    Quote Originally Posted by lovecindy View Post
    one more question, if I have ten students, you have twenty students, can I say your students are twice more than mine?
    I would suggest that you never use "twice more ..." or anything like that. People cannot agree on the meaning. Use "twice as many".

    If you original have 10 students, and now you have 20 students, you now have 100% more, or twice as many. If you had twice more, you'd have 30, to most people. (Twice 10 is 20; 20 more than 10 is 30.)

    PS The "Thanks" button is gone. You need to press "Like" instead.

  8. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #8

    Re: twice as heavy as = twice heavier than ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    These are a very clear way to say this:

    B weights twice what A weights.
    Barb is trying to prove that she can make as many typos as I. No Chanec, Brab!

  9. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #9

    Re: twice as heavy as = twice heavier than ?

    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. heavy
    By Borovac in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 16-Jun-2008, 22:06
  2. Heavy with something
    By nimsooze in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 18-Apr-2008, 01:51
  3. heavy rains, a heavy rain
    By joham in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-Jan-2008, 02:15
  4. sixteen times heavier, fifteen times heavier
    By joham in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-Dec-2007, 07:33
  5. heavier
    By azz in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Jan-2005, 22:26

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •