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    #1

    sweety to mean sweetie

    We were arguing in class if the noun ''sweety" existed. After looking it up in monolingual dictionaries I argued against its existance. The only spelling I could find was "sweetie".
    What would you say?

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    #2

    Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    We were arguing in class if the noun ''sweety" existed. After looking it up in monolingual dictionaries I argued against its existaence. The only spelling I could find was "sweetie".
    What would you say?
    Stick to 'sweetie', if you really must use the word. I generally manage to survive without it.

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    #3

    Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    That's because you're an old curmudgeon. I use it. Though rarely in writing, so it's hard to tell if I say it with the "ie" or the "y" pronunciation.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #4

    Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Stick to 'sweetie', if you really must use the word. I generally manage to survive without it.

    My curmudgeonly father-in-law is a collector of antique bottles.....he has, for example, Bayer aspirin bottles dating back to 1899, not to mention old vinegar bottles, soda pop bottles, etc. Anyway, I actually hadn't realized how Mr. Ouisch and I had fallen into a routine of always referring to or addressing each other as "Sweetie" until one day during a visit to my father-in-law's home (he lives in Georgia, we live in Michigan - we only get to visit there maybe twice per year) when he emerged from the "bottle room" and grumbeld "Here - I saw these at an antique show and bought them as a gift because they reminded me of you two...." He held out two very old emtpy bottles of some long-ago discontinued soda pop called "Sweetie." "It's all you two ever call each other...." he then snorted and sort of rolled his eyes.

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    #5

    Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    That's because you're an old curmudgeon.
    Moi? Aroint thee, witch.

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    He held out two very old emtpy bottles of some long-ago discontinued soda pop called "Sweetie." "It's all you two ever call each other...." he then snorted and sort of rolled his eyes.
    I sort of like him already.

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    #7

    Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I sort of like him already.
    What about spelling wise?

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    #8

    Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    What about spelling wise?
    At my time of life, I am used to living with emtpy bottles

  9. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #9

    Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    I would use sweetie but I am not sure I would go as far as arguing against the existence of sweety.

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    #10

    Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    You can call someone "Sweety" because you can use any name you like. But as a noun, "She is such an old sweetie", the "sweetie" spelling is preferred.
    Just be careful that, in writing, you don't call someone "Sweaty", and you should be OK.

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