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Thread: do little to

  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    do little to

    Hi,

    Question:

    What is the meaning of do in my sentence?

    Sentence:
    Suggestions that Greece might default on its debt will do little to calm the turmoil on global markets over the past week.

    Dictionary:
    do - Definitions in British English Dictionary and Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online
    Does the do mean manage based on the above dictionary?

    Thanks

  2. Member
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    #2

    Re: do little to

    Same as this do here:

    I did not do much today.

    The suggestion will not contribute to the cessation of the abrupt fluctuations that global markets produce. On the contrary...

  3. BobK's Avatar
    Harmless drudge
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    #3

    Re: do little to

    Quote Originally Posted by Afit View Post
    Same as this do here:

    I did not do much today. :

    The suggestion will not contribute to the cessation of the abrupt fluctuations that global markets produce. On the contrary...
    In 'do little to calm' do means 'take calming actions'. I would find the analogy with a use of 'do' that refers to general physical action, as in your example, confusing. (There is similarity, in that both 'do's refer to taking action, but I don't think the example does much to help explain this use of 'do' - which usually takes the form 'do + <action-with-positive-connotations>': examples - do little to help/calm/assuage/add/contribute/alleviate... An exception to this is when there is a positive implication elsewhere in the sentence 'The rain did little to dampen the joy of the occasion' - which personifies the rain as a kill-joy that was trying to dampen the occasion, but only managed to - say - get the bride's gown a bit wet.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 26-Sep-2011 at 16:51. Reason: Correction; there's no positive 'statement' (my original word)

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