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  1. faryan's Avatar
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    #1

    Exclamation up in the years

    what does the above phrase mean here?Dose it convey the same concept that it does in the second sentence?

    1. ' Whether we enrol for the course or not is yet up in the year.'

    2. My uncle is up in years and can't hear too well.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: up in the years

    For the first one, could you possibly mean "is still up in the air"? That would mean it's not yet decided.

    The second one means he is elderly.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: up in the years

    Quote Originally Posted by faryan View Post
    what does the above phrase mean here?Dose it convey the same concept that it does in the second sentence?

    1. ' Whether we enrol for the course or not is yet up in the year.'

    2. My uncle is up in years and can't hear too well.

    Thanks in advance.
    I think you have misheard the phrase in your first statement. I think it should say:

    1) Whether we enrol for the course or not is still up in the air.
    This means that we have not yet decided whether to enrol or not.

    2) My uncle is advanced in age and can't hear too well.
    I wouldn't use "up in years" to mean "old".

  4. faryan's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: up in the years

    well that was the exact word I was dubious about. I read the phrase somewhere and was wondering if it's this way?! thanks dear Barb and emsr!

  5. faryan's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: up in the years

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I think you have misheard the phrase in your first statement. I think it should say:

    1) Whether we enrol for the course or not is still up in the air.
    This means that we have not yet decided whether to enrol or not.

    2) My uncle is advanced in age and can't hear too well.
    wouIdn't use "up in years" to mean "old".

    wouIdn't use "up in years" to mean "old".
    What about 'advanced in years', 'on in years' or 'along in years'? Do they make sense to you? Are those common in the British English?

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: up in the years

    Quote Originally Posted by faryan View Post
    wouIdn't use "up in years" to mean "old".
    What about 'advanced in years', 'on in years' or 'along in years'? Do they make sense to you? Are those common in the British English?
    "Getting on in years" is used to mean "getting old", yes.

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