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  1. lilimo's Avatar
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    #1

    odyssey meaning/ translations

    In one best-selling translation, Odysseus is introduced in the opening lines as a “man of many turns,” while in another this description is rendered as a “man skilled in all ways of contending.”


    What to you is the distinction(s) between these two options, particularly with regards to your reception of Odysseus’ character?

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    #2

    Re: odyssey meaning/ translations

    Quote Originally Posted by lilimo View Post
    In one best-selling translation, Odysseus is introduced in the opening lines as a “man of many turns,” while in another this description is rendered as a “man skilled in all ways of contending.”


    What to you is the distinction(s) between these two options, particularly with regards to your reception of Odysseus’ character?
    Hey,

    It seems to me the second is more positive.

    Sincerely,

    Not Teacher

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: odyssey meaning/ translations

    Quote Originally Posted by lilimo View Post
    In one best-selling translation, Odysseus is introduced in the opening lines as a “man of many turns,” while in another this description is rendered as a “man skilled in all ways of contending.”

    What to you is the distinction(s) between these two options, particularly with regards to your reception of Odysseus’ character?
    That is the sort of question I might expect to be asked at the end of a semester's study of the Odyssey. It's not really a question for a language forum.

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