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    #1

    as and like

    The following is taken from the freedictionary.com, in which 'as' is treated as an adverb, functioning as a preposition meaning 'like' or 'such as' or 'for instance'. What do most native speakers think of this usage of 'as'? Should we use 'like' here instead? Thank you in advance.

    as 1 (z; z when unstressed)
    adv. 2. For instance: large carnivores, as the bear or lion.
    As - definition of As by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

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    #2

    Re: as and like

    I'd use like there.

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    #3

    Re: as and like

    I don't see how an adverb can 'function as a preposition'. A word is either used as an adverb or as a prepositition, in my opinion.

    large carnivores, as the bear or lion sounds very old-fashioned to me. I's use 'such as' or 'eg'.

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    #4

    Re: as and like

    I tend to favour 'such as' over 'like', especially in formal writing.

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    #5

    Re: as and like

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    The following is taken from the freedictionary.com, in which 'as' is treated as an adverb, functioning as a preposition meaning 'like' or 'such as' or 'for instance'. What do most native speakers think of this usage of 'as'? Should we use 'like' here instead? Thank you in advance.

    as 1 (z; z when unstressed)
    adv. 2. For instance: large carnivores, as the bear or lion.
    As - definition of As by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    ONLY A NON-TEACHER'S OPINION


    (1) It's wonderful to meet another fan of "as," my second favorite word in the language.

    (2) I have been trying for years to understand "as," and -- of course -- I still do not.

    (3) Like you, I have never understood why the dictionaries call "as" an adverb in sentences such as yours.

    (4) Of course, as the wonderful posters before me have told you, the important thing is to express the idea in idiomatic English and not worry about what label a word has.

    (5) NEVERTHELESS, I have found some info which I am delighted to share with you.

    (a) The one and only Professor George O. Curme informs us that:

    As is one of the commonest conjunctions in our language. ... In its oldest

    form so it was a determinative ADVERB [my emphasis] pointing to a following

    explanatory statement.

    (i) If you have time, check a good dictionary for the etymology of "as." You will see

    that it is, indeed, related to "so."

    (b) But Professor Curme himself uses the term "explanatory conjunctions" to refer

    to certain words that introduce "a particularization." He gives this example:

    "She possessed certain definite beauties, such as/ as/ like her hair."

    "The mistletoe grows on various trees, such as oaks, poplars, birches."
    (The good professor did NOT specifically say so, but it is my guess that you could also use "as" or "like" in that sentence.)

    (b) Mr. Michael Swan's Practical English Usage has some interesting examples:

    "My doctor told me to avoid fatty foods, such as bacon or hamburgers."
    "In such areas as North Wales or the Lake District, there are now many walkers."
    (Mr. Swan does NOT say so, but it is my guess that you could also say: In areas such as North Wales or the Lake District, ..."

    (c) Finally Funk & Wagnalls New Standard Dictionary of the English Language duly

    classifies "as" as an adverb and conjunction, but it adds:

    In some instances it is almost a preposition. For instance, thus, to wit: introducing an illustration. "Some animals are cunning, as the fox."

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