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    #1

    will=so going to?

    Will is used to make strong predictions. What about "so going to"? Would it convey the same meaning in the following sentence?

    "If he takes a taxi during rush hour, he will be late for dinner."

    "If he takes a taxi during rush hour, he's so going to be late for dinner."

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    #2

    Re: will=so going to?

    "Going to be late" means the same as "will be late." "So" is an intensifier.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: will=so going to?

    'So' is an intensifier, which in formal English intensifies an adjective or adverb - 'so big', 'so happy', 'so green'...'so well', 'so happily', 'so deeply'...

    Recently (only in the last 10-15 years, in my experience) its use has been extended first to other adjective-like words ('You are so rumbled' - meaning 'You have been well-and-truly found out'). Now it's used with more-or-less any grammatical construction: 'You are so in trouble', 'You are so going to...'

    These uses are informal. Use with care.
    Last edited by BobK; 29-Sep-2011 at 18:13. Reason: Addd adverbial examples

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