Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • Qatar

    • Join Date: Aug 2011
    • Posts: 11
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Abscond

    Hi,

    May I ask if somebody is absent to work, can I say he is absconded? or if I planned to absent tomorrow, can I say "I will abscond tomorrow" ?
    For long, I understand the meaning of "abscond" is runway or diappear when he/she had done something wrong. Will this word fit into my sentence?

    many thanks

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 52,425
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Abscond

    May I ask if somebody is absent to work, can I say he is absconded?
    I wouldn't.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • Qatar

    • Join Date: Aug 2011
    • Posts: 11
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Abscond

    I am doubt the usage of "abscond" for disappearing from work. However, some of my colleagues claimed such usage is common and correct.

    Actually, the debate was started when one of my colleague went back to India for vacation and did not show up after his vacation due to sickness. Nevertheles he back to work today, almost 2 weeks late. One Indian guy was saying "if you don't come back you will be classified as Absconded and you will be blacklisted by the labour depatment". I felt the usage of "absconded" was not quite right, we then started mooting about this vocab.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,135
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: Abscond

    In BrE, if you abscond, you get away from somewhere you are not allowed to leave, or run away with somebody's property.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 52,425
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: Abscond

    I don't know about other variants of English, but this usage doesn't work in British English- I look forward to seeing what the situation is in other variants.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •