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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Sep 2011
    • Posts: 78
    #1

    Two consecutive participles in a clause

    Dear Sir/Madam

    I got difficulties in understanding the structure of the first clause of the following sentence.

    "With 73 candidates to be elected unopposed
    , some 854 candidates will be competing for 339 seats, making the race more competitive." (Quoted from SCMP, HK)

    Why there can be two consecutive participles in a clause. To my knowledge, the first participle "elected" is a passive verb and it can 't be followed by
    another passive verb "unopposed" and thus the clause makes no sense unless
    " unopposed" is changed to an adverb form. Would anyone explain it to me ?

    Thanks so much.



  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #2

    Re: Two consecutive participles in a clause

    'Unopposed' is being used as an adjective.

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