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  1. zorank's Avatar
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    #1

    "in a form of the following Lemma" or "in the form of a following Lemma"

    or "in the form of the following Lemma".

    Which one would be right?
    Zoran
    Last edited by zorank; 05-Oct-2011 at 12:46.

  2. JohnParis's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "in a form of the following Lemma" or "in the form of a following Lemma"

    Are you speaking of the mathematical (a subsidiary or intermediate theorem in an argument or proof)?
    If yes, please provide the entire sentence.

  3. zorank's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "in a form of the following Lemma" or "in the form of a following Lemma"

    Here is the full text.

    "Now we are ready to prove some key results. The first question is whether the ansatz results in moments that are positive. This is answered in a form of the following Lemma."

    Lemma 1: The text of the Lemma comes here.

    Proof: Proof comes after that.

    By the way, why would that be important? Please bear with me.

  4. JohnParis's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "in a form of the following Lemma" or "in the form of a following Lemma"

    This is answered in the form of the following Lemma:

    By the way, why would that be important?
    Well, it's because I don't know you and while I have the feeling that you are quite involved in statistics and theories surrounding statistical analyses, I wasn't sure.
    Lemma has two other definitions: "a heading indicating the subject or argument of a literary composition, an annotation, or a dictionary entry" and "the lower bract of the floret of a grass. Compare with palea."

  5. zorank's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "in a form of the following Lemma" or "in the form of a following Lemma"

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnParis View Post
    ... "a heading indicating the subject or argument of a literary composition, an annotation, or a dictionary entry" and "the lower bract of the floret of a grass. Compare with palea."
    You are right, I am scientist (loussy at writing ). Thank you for teaching me about my ignorrance regarding the meaning of the word Lemma.

    p.s. should I use "the word Lemma" or just "word Lemma"?

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "in a form of the following Lemma" or "in the form of a following Lemma"

    Quote Originally Posted by zorank View Post
    "the word Lemma"
    "word Lemma"
    5

  7. zorank's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "in a form of the following Lemma" or "in the form of a following Lemma"

    An if I ask you why "the word Lemma", you will probably say that I am a nasty double agent who is trying to ruin this site.

    An if I ask you what is the difference between "the word Lemma" and "word Lemma", since there is only one such word, why would one need "the" then, you would probably say I should be banished from this site.

    The problem is, these things are not obvious to me at all. Slavic languages do not have articles.

  8. 5jj's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: "in a form of the following Lemma" or "in the form of a following Lemma"

    Yup

  9. zorank's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: "in a form of the following Lemma" or "in the form of a following Lemma"

    Knew it, so I won't ask...

  10. JohnParis's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: "in a form of the following Lemma" or "in the form of a following Lemma"

    Actually, Zorank, you answered several of your questions when you wrote "The problem is ... Slavic languages do not have articles."
    You are absolutely correct.
    Good written and spoken English requires that you master the use of articles.
    It takes effort, but the results are more than worth it.
    John

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