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    #1

    to jumble up - to change around

    - There were many objects changed around/ jumbled up on my desk.

    - When Francisco got into my room and sat down at my desk he changed many things around/ jumbled many things up!

    Do these two verbs mean the same? Can they be used in the same contexts?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to jumble up - to change around

    You can move things around so their position is changed without making a mess.

    If things are left in a jumble, he made a mess.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: to jumble up - to change around

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    You can move things around so their position is changed without making a mess.

    If things are left in a jumble, he made a mess.
    And what about the two sentences I have written? Do they make sense? Are they possible in English?

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to jumble up - to change around

    They are possible, yes.

    I'd probably say it more like this:
    When Francisco used my desk, he left everything in a mess. (I don't use "Jumble")
    When Francisco used my desk, he moved everything around/he didn't leave things they way he found them,
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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