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    #1

    grain and corn; new-ground fires

    Dear teachers,

    I have two questions:

    I feel confused by "grain" and "corn" in British English.
    corn:
    1. British English: plants such as wheat, barley, and oats or their seeds.
    2. American English a tall plant with large yellow seeds that grow together on a cob (=long hard part), which is cooked and eaten as a vegetable or fed to animals [= maize British English]

    grain:
    1. the seeds of crops such as corn, wheat, or rice that are gathered for use as food, or these crops themselves
    2. a single seed of corn, wheat etc.

    Does this mean "grain" does not include wheat, barley and oats? And does "grain" in British English bare in part the same meaning with "corn" in American English?

    No.2
    "new-ground fires " means fires set by people to burn weeds so that fields that are once covered with weeds can be used to plant crops. Is that right?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Last edited by jiang; 09-Oct-2011 at 10:19.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: grain and corn; new-ground fires

    This is the opinion of one speaker of BrE:

    1. British English: plants such as wheat, barley, and oats or their seeds.
    2. American English a tall plant with large yellow seeds that grow together on a cob (=long hard part), which is cooked and eaten as a vegetable or fed to animals [= maize British English]
    Many speakers of BrE use the word in the American sense, though usually in such expressions as sweetcorn and corn on the cob.

    grain:
    1. the seeds of crops such as corn, wheat, or rice that are gathered for use as food, or these crops themselves
    2. a single seed of corn, wheat etc. We use it this way in BrE, too

    Does this mean "grain" does not include wheat, barley and oats? No, it doesn't. They come under 'etc'.

    Jiang, if you are quoting from a dictionary, please name your source.

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    #3

    Re: grain and corn; new-ground fires

    Hi,
    I quoted the definitions from Longman English Dictionary Online.
    I asked the question because there are four sentences in the text that is quite confusing:
    This has been a dry spring and the corn has kept well in the earth where the grain has sprouted. The ground squirrels love this corn. The digu up rows of it and eat the sweet grains. The young corn stlks are killed and we have to replant the corn.

    It seems me "corn" and "grain" refer to the same thing---corn. Or is it possible that corn and grain were planted in the same fields?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    This is the opinion of one speaker of BrE:

    1. British English: plants such as wheat, barley, and oats or their seeds.
    2. American English a tall plant with large yellow seeds that grow together on a cob (=long hard part), which is cooked and eaten as a vegetable or fed to animals [= maize British English]
    Many speakers of BrE use the word in the American sense, though usually in such expressions as sweetcorn and corn on the cob.

    grain:
    1. the seeds of crops such as corn, wheat, or rice that are gathered for use as food, or these crops themselves
    2. a single seed of corn, wheat etc. We use it this way in BrE, too

    Does this mean "grain" does not include wheat, barley and oats? No, it doesn't. They come under 'etc'.

    Jiang, if you are quoting from a dictionary, please name your source.

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    #4

    Re: grain and corn; new-ground fires

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    I asked the question because there are four sentences in the text that is quite confusing:
    This has been a dry spring and the corn has kept well in the earth where the grain has sprouted. The ground squirrels love this corn. The digu up rows of it and eat the sweet grains. The young corn stlks are killed and we have to replant the corn.

    It seems me "corn" and "grain" refer to the same thing---corn. Or is it possible that corn and grain were planted in the same fields?
    I believe "corn" means maize and "grain" means seeds here.

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    #5

    Re: grain and corn; new-ground fires

    Hi birdeen's call,
    Thank you so much for your explanation. Now I see.
    Could you please kindly explain the other question: new-ground fires?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    I believe "corn" means maize and "grain" means seeds here.

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    #6

    Re: grain and corn; new-ground fires

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Could you please kindly explain the other question: new-ground fires?
    I think your interpretation is correct.

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    #7

    Re: grain and corn; new-ground fires

    Hi brideen's call,

    Thank you very much for your help.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    I think your interpretation is correct.

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