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    #1

    up the ante

    I have trouble understanding the following in red. What is it saying in the context?

    When I plan a dinner for five or a seminar for fifty, I approach it with just the same respect for the investment each of us is making in the outcome of the gathering. I expect revelation and fransformation and the highest-level contributions from myself and everyone else involved. And if there's a chance to squeeze in a little dancing with my group, I do that, too. Living as if every day is TED is one way to up the ante, let me tell you!

    Thank you.

  1. JohnParis's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: up the ante

    It's a poker (card game) term.

    The "ante" is what all players pay to participate in the game. Each player pays the ante (which is also known as "the stake") so that there is something to win even before anyone gets any cards. Depending on the game and who you are playing with, the ante can be really small (like $1 or $2 if you're playing with friends just to drink beer and smoke cigars) or quite large ($5000) to keep out the riff-raff.
    When you raise the ante, you raise the minimum prize (the stakes) of the game.

    John

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    #3

    Re: up the ante

    Thank you very much for your explanation. I've always wanted to know where this idiom comes from. I didn't have a clue because I don't play cards and hence don't know the terminology.

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    #4

    Re: up the ante

    [QUOTE=unpakwon;809319]


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Mr. Paris has given us all an excellent explanation of "up the ante." I know no

    thing about cards.

    (2) My dictionary tells me that "up the ante" in plain English means to increase some

    action, especially in a conflict. So if country X uses tanks in a war, then maybe

    country Y will up the ante by using missiles.

    (3) I do not think, however, that your quotation involves conflict. He refers to squeezing

    in a little dancing. So I think that he is using the term in a positive manner. When he

    has a meeting, he expects the "highest-level contributions" of himself and others.

    And, in addition to the "highest-level contributions" from himself and others, he tries

    to up the ante, i.e., go beyond those "highest-level contributions." For example, to

    even get some time for dancing!

    (4) What in the world is TED? I asked Professor Google, but she did not give me an

    answer.

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    #5

    Re: up the ante

    Not a teacher.

    [QUOTE=TheParser;809339]
    Quote Originally Posted by unpakwon View Post

    (4) What in the world is TED? I asked Professor Google, but she did not give me an

    answer.
    That's what I was asking myself, too. I think it could be an abbreviation (that I'm not familiar with) for The End of Days. Live every day as if it were the last one, i.e. the end of the world. Carpe diem, as it were.
    But who knows, maybe I'm completely wrong and somebody will enlighten us here.

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    #6

    Re: up the ante

    That makes sense to me.

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    #7

    Re: up the ante


  5. JohnParis's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: up the ante

    Quote Originally Posted by unpakwon View Post
    I have trouble understanding the following in red. What is it saying in the context?

    When I plan a dinner for five or a seminar for fifty, I approach it with just the same respect for the investment each of us is making in the outcome of the gathering. I expect revelation and fransformation and the highest-level contributions from myself and everyone else involved. And if there's a chance to squeeze in a little dancing with my group, I do that, too. Living as if every day is TED is one way to up the ante, let me tell you!

    Thank you.
    The quote itself sounds as if it comes from a manual about event planning and the person speaking is the head of the group planning the event. The speaker sounds like he is motivating his employees to give everything they have to make certain the gathering is a success. He expects his employees to think "outside of the box". The reference to dancing is just one way of saying that his employees should think of anything that will make the event better. Anything.
    I believe that TED does stand for "the end of days", and the speaker is asking his employees to live every day as if it was their last so that they will dare to think great and inventive thoughts. By doing this, you make the game of life and business more interesting. You "up the ante" and hence make it all more exciting.
    This type of motivational training was first introduced by a man named Dale Breckenridge Carnegie in the United States in 1936. Many people find it inspirational. Many find it banal.
    Last edited by JohnParis; 09-Oct-2011 at 15:34. Reason: word order

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    #9

    Re: up the ante

    Thank you all for the kind explanation.

    There is some misunderstanding about TED. I'm sorry. I should have explained.
    TED refers to "Technology Entertainment Design, an annual multidisciplinary conference", where big minds share "ideas worth spreading" on various issues. The author was greatly inspired by the lectures in the TED conference and is a big fan of TED. And she seems to like TED-like events. Let me provide you with more context.

    <<Now, just as you can't eat ice cream every day, you can't expect mind-blowing TED-like experiences every day. Or can you? Here's what I have learned about curating the group experience from participating in TEDGlobal at Oxford and curating TEDxMIA: Every time you put people together, it's an opportunity to invent a new thread of the convertation..... Living as if every day is TED is one way to up the ante, let me tell you!>>

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    #10

    Re: up the ante

    Of course ! TED .... TED: Ideas worth spreading
    I actually thought of this, but decided against mentioning it because the last sentence now doesn't seem to fit with the rest of the text.
    Any way, I hope you understand what "up the ante" means
    Best,
    John

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