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    #1

    infinitive+adjective

    [SIZE=2px]The beggar whom we had suspected to be guilty turned out to be innocent. / The beggar whom we had suspected guilty turned out innocent. What is the difference in meaning?
    [/SIZE]

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    #2

    Re: infinitive+adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by vedinfo1 View Post
    [SIZE=2px]The beggar whom we had suspected to be guilty turned out to be innocent. / The beggar whom we had suspected guilty turned out innocent. What is the difference in meaning?[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=2px][/SIZE]

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) For easier analysis, may I simplify your sentence? Let's delete (erase) the adjective (relative) clause. So we have two sentences:

    (a) The beggar turned out to be innocent.

    (b) The beggar turned out innocent.

    (2) I found an interesting article on the Web taken from the Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary:

    (a) The job turned out to be harder than we thought. "Turn out to be" = to prove to be.

    (b) If the day turns out wet, we may have to change our plans. = "Turn out" = to develop or end in a particular way.

    (3) Therefore, it is only my opinion that it might be better to say:

    The beggar whom we had suspected to be guilty turned out to be innocent.

    EDIT: Many thanks to the moderator for pointing out my mistake.
    Last edited by TheParser; 16-Oct-2011 at 20:33.

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    #3

    Re: infinitive+adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) For easier analysis, may I simplify your sentence? Let's delete (erase) the adjective (relative) clause. So we have two sentences:

    (a) The beggar turned out to be innocent.

    (b) The beggar turned out innocent.

    (2) I found an interesting article on the Web taken from the Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary:

    (a) The job turned out to be harder than we thought. "Turn out to be" = to prove to be.

    (b) If the day turns out wet, we may have to change our plans. = "Turn out" = to develop or end in a particular way.

    (3) Therefore, it is only my opinion that it might be better to say:

    The beggar whom we had suspected to be guilty turned out to be guilty.
    Not if he was innocent.

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