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  1. Banned
    Student or Learner
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    #1

    More (Of)

    "He is more of a student than a teacher."
    "He is more a student than a teacher."

    If I want to talk about a student teacher that acts like a teacher student, which sentence is standard English?
    Last edited by jimcool; 18-Oct-2011 at 09:07.

  2. Banned
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    #2

    Re: More (Of)

    Sorry for the error. Here is the correct version:
    -----------------------------------------------------

    "He is more of a student than a teacher."
    "He is more a student than a teacher."

    If I want to talk about a teacher that acts like a student, which sentence is standard English?

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    #3

    Re: More (Of)

    Quote Originally Posted by jimcool View Post
    Sorry for the error. Here is the correct version:
    -----------------------------------------------------

    "He is more of a student than a teacher."
    "He is more a student than a teacher."

    If I want to talk about a teacher that acts like a student, which sentence is standard English?

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I really liked your question, for it really made me think and do research.

    (2) This is only my opinion, based on what I have read in Professor George O. Curme's

    great book A Grammar of the English Language.

    (3) IF I understood him, you can express that idea in two ways:

    (a) He is more student than teacher.

    (i) "more student" is like an adjective. It refers to "He." It's an adjective, just

    like "He is taller than the teacher." ("-er" really = more. Of course, you cannot say "He is studenter than teacher.")

    (b) He is more of a student than a teacher.

    (i) The great professor says that in this construction (kind of sentence), we analyze

    "more" as a pronoun. That is why we need to use "of a."

    (4) Here are some of his examples when we use "more" to make an adjective out of a

    noun:

    She is more mother than wife.
    She was more woman than they. (You can't say "womaner")

    (5) Here are some of his examples when we use "more" as a pronoun:

    Charles was more of a gentleman than a king.
    Smith is more of a teacher than his brother.

    (6) It is only my opinion that most native speakers would use the pronoun sentence:

    Tom: Do you like our teacher?

    Mona: Not really.

    Tom: Why?

    Mona: Because he seems to be more of a student than a teacher.

    Tom: What do you mean?

    Mona: Well, for one thing, he wants to be cool, so he wears blue jeans. I want my teachers to dress like teachers.

    Tom: And what else?

    Mona: He tries so hard to be friends. I don't want my teachers to be my friends. I just want them to teach me something that I don't know.

    Tom: That's right!

    Mona: Above all, he doesn't know his subject well. I think that he reads the book five

    pages ahead of us every night.

    EDIT: I think that many speakers drop the "of," so they might simply say: He is more (of) a student than a teacher. Since you are an excellent learner, I suggest that you include the word "of."
    Last edited by TheParser; 18-Oct-2011 at 16:12.

  3. JohnParis's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: More (Of)

    Jimcool's initial clarification of the meaning he sought was: " If I want to talk about a teacher that acts like a student, which sentence is standard English"?

    All of the above responses are great (although I do think Mona sounds a bit malicious) but I think it's important to state that if you wish to say that the teacher acts more like a student then that's exactly what you should say. He acts more like a student than a teacher.

    In US graduate schools, professors often have teaching assistants (TA) who teach (supposedly) less than they study. Lets say Jim is a TA. Jim is more of a student than a teacher. Jim is more a student than a teacher. Both sentences work to describe Jim.

    Finally, to TheParser whose posts I enjoy immensely, George O. Curme's book was published in 1931, and I don't think it was ever revised. His work is classic rather than modernistic. While still totally accurate, George - like myself - should have a 25,000 mile check-up, if just to freshen the carpeting.
    George Oliver Curme - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: More (Of)

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnParis View Post
    Finally, to TheParser whose posts I enjoy immensely, George O. Curme's book was published in 1931, and I don't think it was ever revised. His work is classic rather than modernistic.
    Oh, Parser. I have been joined. You'll have to be very careful in what you pick from the venerable Curme now.
    While still totally accurate (for the English of his day - 5) George - like myself - should have a 25,000 mile check-up, if just to freshen the carpeting.

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    #6

    Re: More (Of)

    As the young people say (I think):

    CURME RULES!

    CURME ROCKS!

    CURME IS THE MAN!
    Last edited by TheParser; 18-Oct-2011 at 20:33.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: More (Of)

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    CURME RULES! ...
    ... are sometimes inappropriate today.
    Last edited by 5jj; 18-Oct-2011 at 20:39.

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