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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    eclipsing event

    Can anyone explain what does the following sentence means :

    1) Losing 60-plus seats is a very eclipsing event
    2) Nine-and-a-half percent unemployment is a very eclipsing event

    Thanks in advance

  2. JohnParis's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: eclipsing event

    Sorry, Gychung, but as you have used the word, it means nothing. There is no such thing as an eclipsing event.

    Do you have additional context?
    John

  3. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: eclipsing event

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnParis View Post
    Sorry, Gychung, but as you have used the word, it means nothing. There is no such thing as an eclipsing event.

    Do you have additional context?
    John
    Hi John,
    Thanks for your reply.
    It was taken from a news article and extracts as follows :

    Despite losing the speaker's gavel in an election that saw Republicans gain at least 60 seats and take control of the House of Representatives, Rep. Nancy Pelosi told ABC's Diane Sawyer on Wednesday that she has "no regrets."

    "We believe we did the right thing, and we worked very hard in our campaigns to convey that to the American people," said Pelosi. "Nine-and-a-half percent unemployment is a very eclipsing event. If people don't have a job, they're not too interested in how you intend for them to have a job. They want to see results."

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: eclipsing event

    It seems to mean that one event can block out another, as the moon can block out the sun in an eclipse. I would not use American (or British) politicians as a guide to good language usage.

    Most of us would agree with JohnParis.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: eclipsing event

    Their unemployement is the only thing these people can figuratively see. It blocks everything else from their (figurative) view.

    It's not uncommon to hear something like "It eclipsed everything else" to mean that "it" is the most important thing, by far, someone is experiencing.

    I don't find the usage appalling. Just an interesting usage.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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