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  1. beachboy's Avatar
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    #1

    few more

    He wanted me to stay a few more weeks.
    He wanted me to stay a few weeks more.
    Are both right? Personally, I prefer the first, but I don't know why.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: few more

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    He wanted me to stay a few more weeks.
    He wanted me to stay a few weeks more.
    Are both right? Personally, I prefer the first, but I don't know why.
    They are both fine. The first one is more common.

  3. JohnParis's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: few more

    Yes, both are correct.
    However, I would say: He wanted me to stay a few weeks longer.

    John

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    #4

    Re: few more

    [QUOTE=beachboy;813925]He wanted me to stay a few more weeks.
    He wanted me to stay a few weeks more.


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) About a year ago, I found an (not "the") answer that satisfies me, so I am

    pleased to pass it along to you. You, of course, will have to decide for yourself

    whether you wish to accept this explanation.

    (2) This source explained it this way:

    "He wanted me to stay a few more weeks. = "a few more" applies to the noun "weeks."

    "He wanted me to stay a few weeks more." = "more" is an adverb that applies to the verb "stay." Something like: He wanted me to stay more ("longer," as Mr. Paris said) to the extent of a few weeks.

    (3) Neat explanation, don't you think? Well, I like it.

    (4) And where did I get this from? Well, of course, at the best English grammar helpline in the world.

    (a) The poster's member name was Pedroski.

    (b) Just go to the search box and type: Which one is true. Pedroski.

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