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    #1

    Question "If you've ever prayed before, now is the time to do it"

    Hello,

    please help me understand the sentence in red below:
    Lindquist's employer, Community Support Services, had recently put workers through a tornado drill, so Lindquist and co-worker Ryan Tackett knew what to do. Because there was no basement or shelter and the residents moved too slowly to relocate, Lindquist and Tackett placed mattresses over the men for protection, then climbed atop the mattresses for added weight.

    It seemed like little more than a precaution until Lindquist heard the unmistakable roar of the twister. "I told Ryan, 'If you've ever prayed before, now is the time to do it,'" he said.
    What does this mean? Did he mean to say:
    1. If you have never prayed before, (then) now is the time to do it.
    or
    2. If you have ever prayed before, (then) now is the time to do it (again/like never before)?

    I understand that he is asking his coworker to pray, but I get the sense that by using these words he is asking him to pray fervently

    The above passage is from this news story: 'Miracle' tornado survivor denied workers' comp

    Thank you

  1. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "If you've ever prayed before, now is the time to do it"

    Lindquist seems to have gotten it wrong. Your first interpretation is the correct one.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: "If you've ever prayed before, now is the time to do it"

    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    Lindquist seems to have gotten it wrong. Your first interpretation is the correct one.
    @riquecohen, thank you.

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