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    #1

    to go through and to run up against

    - We've been going through quite a lot of problems here recently.
    - We've been running up against quite a lot of problems here recently.

    The questions are:
    Are these two verbs synonyms?
    Do they mean the exact thing?
    Is there one in particular which is most used in this case?

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to go through and to run up against

    I'd use only the second. I go through difficult times.

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    #3

    Re: to go through and to run up against

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I'd use only the second. I go through difficult times.
    What do you mean by "I'd use"? Is it ungrammatical? Or we'd better use "to go through" with "difficult times" and "to run up against" with "a lot of problems"?
    Is it just a problem of collocations or something?

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    #4

    Re: to go through and to run up against

    What do you mean by "I'd use"? Is it ungrammatical? Or we'd better use "to go through" with "difficult times" and "to run up against" with "a lot of problems"?
    Is it just a problem of collocations or something?

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    #5

    Re: to go through and to run up against

    Anyone who can answer my thread?

  2. JohnParis's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: to go through and to run up against

    I'd is the contraction for I would.

    Fivejedjon said "I'd (I would) use...", which is perfectly correct.
    You asked "Is there one in particular which is most used in this case?" and he responded with his (correct) answer.

    "Are these two verbs synonyms?" No.
    To run up against something is not the same as to go through something.

    "Do they mean the exact thing?" No.
    To run up against something is not the same as to go through something.

    John

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    #7

    Re: to go through and to run up against

    "Go through" is not the proper expression here. We might say we "worked through" some problems.

    "Working through" means the problems were encountered and a solution was found.

    "Running up against" (or "running into") a lot of problems means that the problems are not all solved. We are still working to solve some or many of the problems.

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    #8

    Re: to go through and to run up against

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    "Go through" is not the proper expression here. We might say we "worked through" some problems.

    "Working through" means the problems were encountered and a solution was found.

    "Running up against" (or "running into") a lot of problems means that the problems are not all solved. We are still working to solve some or many of the problems.
    Thanks so much for you help. So, you use "work through" to talk about problems that you've come across and that you've already sorted out; "run up against" to talk about problems you might have come across but you have not solved them yet, so you're still working on them...Am I right?
    But what about this: Amelia has been going through a difficult time at work and she's been going through lots of problems ?
    According to what you have explained so far, if I use "work through" instead of "go through" it means that she has had problems but she has solved them already; if I use "run up against" it means she hasn't solved them yet...what about the meaning of "go through"?

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    #9

    Re: to go through and to run up against

    If she is "going" through, then the activity is still happening. If it says she "went" through, then it is over.

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