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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    think(believe) vs think(consider)

    Is this true that when 'think' means 'believe', it shoudn't be used a progressive form, while it's possible as the meaning of "consider" as in the following?

    ex1) I think that he is a genius.(think= believe)
    I am thinking that he is a genius - incorrect
    ex2) I'm thinking about breaking up with John. (think= consider) -correct.

  2. nyota's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: think(believe) vs think(consider)

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Is this true that when 'think' means 'believe', it shoudn't be used a progressive form, while it's possible as the meaning of "consider" as in the following?

    ex1) I think that he is a genius.(think= believe)
    I am thinking that he is a genius - incorrect
    ex2) I'm thinking about breaking up with John. (think= consider) -correct.
    ...........................
    I'm not a teacher
    ............................

    Yes, it's true.

    - What do you think (=believe) will happen? - You're asking for somebody's opinion
    - You look serious. What are you thinking about? - Somebody's taking a conscious effort to process something in their mind, they're considering something

    Parts in italics are taken from the English Grammar in Use (intermediate) by Murphy.

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: think(believe) vs think(consider)

    Quote Originally Posted by nyota View Post
    ...........................
    I'm not a teacher
    ............................

    Yes, it's true.

    - What do you think (=believe) will happen? - You're asking for somebody's opinion
    - You look serious. What are you thinking about? - Somebody's taking a conscious effort to process something in their mind, they're considering something

    Parts in italics are taken from the English Grammar in Use (intermediate) by Murphy.
    So when it's "believe", you can't ever use a progressive form? Do you bet it? I'd like to know from real-life expressions.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: think(believe) vs think(consider)

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    So when it's "believe", you can't ever use a progressive form? Do you bet it? I'd like to know from real-life expressions.
    keannu, you should know by now it's possible to say almost anything in English if you are prepared to think up weird contexts. There is little point in doing this.

    I try not to use the word 'never' when I talk about points of English grammar. If I do, somebody, somewhere, is going to find an example of what I have claimed can never be said.

    On the subject of weird contexts, think of one in which this dialogue is possible:

    A: Why did we do we do it tomorrow? Why didn't we do it next week?
    B. I thought we were doing it later this evening. We were doing it this evening yesterday.

    C: No, We were doing it tomorrow; we did it next week last year, but George said it was too late, so he decided that tomorrow was the right time.


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