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    #1

    Adverb - Off and out

    Dear All,

    Is there any difference between the two sentences ?

    He is off to visit Peter.

    He is out to visit Peter.

    Thanks

    Rajan
    Last edited by rajan; 30-Oct-2011 at 08:17.

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    #2

    Re: Adverb - Off and out

    Quote Originally Posted by rajan View Post
    Dear All,

    Is there any difference between the two sentences ?

    He is off to visit Peter.

    He is out to visit Peter.

    Thanks

    Rajan
    The second one is not natural English, it would be better as "He is out visiting Peter".
    What do you think the difference would be between that and your first sentence?

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    #3

    Re: Adverb - Off and out

    Quote Originally Posted by rajan View Post
    Dear All,

    Is there any difference between the two sentences ?

    He is off to visit Peter.

    He is out to visit Peter.

    Thanks

    Rajan

    NOT A TEACHER


    Tom: Can you help me now?

    Mona: Sorry! Don't have time.

    Tom: Why not?

    Mona: I'm off to visit Peter. ( = I'm leaving now.)

    ***

    Joe: Is Ruth here?

    Alice: No.

    Joe: Where is she?

    Alice: Oh, she's out visiting Peter. (She is not here because she is at Peter's home right now.)

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    #4

    Re: Adverb - Off and out

    I got the point. You explanation forced me to ask one more question :

    Does off mean - "about to leave"
    and out mean - " being out"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    NOT A TEACHER


    Tom: Can you help me now?

    Mona: Sorry! Don't have time.

    Tom: Why not?

    Mona: I'm off to visit Peter. ( = I'm leaving now.)

    ***

    Joe: Is Ruth here?

    Alice: No.

    Joe: Where is she?

    Alice: Oh, she's out visiting Peter. (She is not here because she is at Peter's home right now.)
    Last edited by rajan; 30-Oct-2011 at 12:17.

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    #5

    Re: Adverb - Off and out

    I was reading a grammar book in which it was written that certain adverbs takes infinitive, Out and Off is one of them. Thus I wrote "out to visit".

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    The second one is not natural English, it would be better as "He is out visiting Peter".
    What do you think the difference would be between that and your first sentence?

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    #6

    Re: Adverb - Off and out

    Quote Originally Posted by rajan View Post

    Does off mean - "about to leave"
    and out mean - " being out"

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) We non-teachers are not allowed to give answers unless we are pretty (almost)

    sure that we are correct. So I shall not answer your question, for I am not confident

    enough to do so. Let's wait for a teacher's answer.

    (2) All I can is to give some more examples:

    (a) Where's the boss? Oh, he's out to lunch. ( = He's having lunch)

    (b) It's 5 p.m. and Friday. Well, I'm off for the weekend now. (= absent for two days)

    (c) Mona is so excited. The latest fall fashions are now out. (available to be seen and bought.)

    (d) At the horse races, the announcer tells the people: And they're off! [The horses

    have just started to race.]

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    #7

    Re: Adverb - Off and out

    Quote Originally Posted by rajan View Post
    I was reading a grammar book in which it was written that certain adverbs takes infinitive, Out and Off is one of them. Thus I wrote "out to visit".

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Again, we will have to wait for a teacher to answer you.

    (2) I checked my dictionaries, and it seems that some dictionaries do not feel that

    "out" is an adverb in "He is out visiting Peter." Some dictionaries feel that it is better

    defined as an adjective that means "not at home/work."

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