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    #1

    on

    He won over three hundred dollarsーmore than enough to get home onーwith his second quarter in the slot machine.

    What does the 'on' imply here? Is this 'on' really necessary?

    Is the 'on' in question the same in meaning as this?

    These days cars run on leaded gas.
    Last edited by Taka; 14-Nov-2011 at 08:13.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: on

    'On' can suggest 'with the financial support of' -

    I have to live on 100 a week.
    She brought up seven children on just her widow's pension.


    When the preposition comes at the end of a clause, as in your example, it may be dropped, but it should be there for complete sense.

    If a car runs on a certain type of fuel, it needs that fuel to make the engine go. This is clearly different.

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    #3

    Re: on

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    '
    If a car runs on a certain type of fuel, it needs that fuel to make the engine go. This is clearly different.
    Both ons are in the same family #7 here, aren't they?

    on - Dictionary definition and pronunciation - Yahoo! Education

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    #4

    Re: on

    Your second example is clearly covered by 7b - "Used to indicate a source of power or energy: The car runs on methane." I don't feel that the first example is specifically covered in that list

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    #5

    Re: on

    Hmm...roughly speaking, I think 'basis' is some sort of support.

    If you were supposed to categorize the on in question, #7 would be the closest, I guess.

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    #6

    Re: on

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka View Post
    Hmm...roughly speaking, I think 'basis' is some sort of support.

    If you were supposed to categorize the "on" in question, #7 would be the closest, I guess.
    If you wish.

    Alternatively, you could go to another dictionary, the OALD for example, and find, "13. supported finacially by sth: to live on a pension/a student grant; to be on a low wage;You can't feed a family on 50 a week.".

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    #7

    Re: on

    I've found that your 'on a pension' and 'on principle' are in the same category in the dictionary I have.

    I think we basically have the same idea.

    Well, anyway, thanks 5jj!

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