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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
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    #1

    In full possession of

    A. You should only drive when you're in full possession of your faculties, otherwise the consequences are hard to pre-estimate.
    B. You should only drive when you're in full possession of your senses, otherwise accidents are hard to pre-anticipate.

    Are these senteces the same meaning and natural in a daily conversation?

    Thank you so much

    • Member Info
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    #2

    Re: In full possession of

    Don't really like either - sorry.

    I prefer full possession of faculties over senses, but that's not the problem.
    If you anticipate, you're trying to guess something before it happens, so what are you doing when pre-anticipating (or estimating) something?
    Also, in this case, the only real consequences are accidents, so I prefer to use the more accurate word of 'accidents'.

    Maybe something along the lines of

    You should only drive when you're in full possession of your faculties, otherwise accidents may be harder to avoid.

    (still not 100% happy with that, but I haven't had a cup of coffee yet ...)

  1. JohnParis's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: In full possession of

    Pre-estimate and pre-anticipate are not English words.
    Neither sentence is natural in a daily conversation.

    These are more likely to be heard:
    Driving in full possession of your faculties reduces accidents.
    Accidents can happen while driving under the influence of controlled substances.
    Do not drink and drive.
    Drive sober.

    John

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: In full possession of

    You should drive only when in full possession of your faculties, otherwise there may be unforeseen and unfortunate consequences.

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