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    #1

    I acutally have

    1) I actually have plans for this weekend.
    2) I have plans for this weekend.

    What is the difference with and without "actually"?

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    #2

    Re: I acutally have

    The word 'actually' here acts to emphasise that fact that the person has plans for the weekend. It implies that this isn't the standard situation.

    Alternatively, it could be used (depending on tone used) to indicate that the speaker considers his/her weekend plans to be somehow better than those of the other person.

  1. JohnParis's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: I acutally have

    1) I actually have plans for this weekend.
    2) I have plans for this weekend.


    The adverb 'actually' means:
    1. as the truth or facts of a situation; really : we must pay attention to what young people are actually doing | the time actually worked on a job. I would think your sentence falls into this category of usage. I have included the rest below for your information.

    2. [as sentence adverb ] used to emphasize that something someone has said or done is surprising : he actually expected me to be pleased about it!
    • used when expressing an opinion, typically one that is not expected : “Actually,” she said icily, “I don't care who you go out with.”
    • used when expressing a contradictory opinion or correcting someone : “Tom seems to be happy.” “He isn't, actually, not any more.”
    • used to introduce a new topic or to add information to a previous statement : he had a thick Brooklyn accent—he sounded like my grandfather actually.

    I'm not quite certain I understand your request concerning the second sentence. I have plans means exactly what it says.

    John

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    #4

    Re: I acutally have

    Quote Originally Posted by goodstudent View Post
    1) I actually have plans for this weekend.
    2) I have plans for this weekend.

    What is the difference with and without "actually"?
    I have two comments to make about "actually"
    - For many language users it is a "false friend". It is very similar to a word in their own language but it has a different usage in English. Spanish, French and German speakers have a similar word which means: now, at this moment.
    - In English "actually" means: the fact is, in fact, really. So your example could be a response to:
    • Do you want to come skiing with us this weekend ?
    • Actually I have plans for this weekend.
    Many native English speakers (especially ones from the UK) use "actually" in a redundant sense which only fills time but adds nothing to the sentence.

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    #5

    Re: I acutally have

    Quote Originally Posted by waflob View Post
    The word 'actually' here acts to emphasise that fact that the person has plans for the weekend. It implies that this isn't the standard situation.

    Alternatively, it could be used (depending on tone used) to indicate that the speaker considers his/her weekend plans to be somehow better than those of the other person.

    If the sentences are

    1) I actually think the food is nice
    2) I think the food is nice

    In 1, does it mean that the food is usually not nice, as you mention "It implies that this isn't the standard situation."

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    #6

    Re: I acutally have

    Quote Originally Posted by goodstudent View Post
    If the sentences are

    1) I actually think the food is nice
    2) I think the food is nice

    In 1, does it mean that the food is usually not nice, as you mention "It implies that this isn't the standard situation."
    If you were eating in company and someone made a negative comment about the food, you could use 1) as a way of indicating that your opinion is different and that you think it's good.

    If someone just asked what you thought, you would probably use 2)

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