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    #1

    Do these two expressions mean the same for native speakers?

    Hello,
    Please explain if two expressions below have the same meaning for native speakers or not:
    1) first class of people
    2) first class people

    Thanks in advance,
    Wojtek

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    #2

    Re: Do these two expressions mean the same for native speakers?

    Quote Originally Posted by wojtek_himself View Post
    Hello,
    Please explain if two expressions below have the same meaning for native speakers or not:
    1) first class of people
    2) first class people

    Thanks in advance,
    Wojtek
    It depends on context. Please provide in a complete sentence for each.

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    #3

    Re: Do these two expressions mean the same for native speakers?

    Let's consider the following example:
    "There are two groups: under 18 and others. For the first class of people we will offer 10% discount".
    My questions are as follow:
    1) In the sentence above, is it allowed to use "first class people" in place of "first class of people" ?
    2) Is my intuition right to say that "first class people" is sort of classifying people into better and worse group, while "first class of people" is neutral and it is like saying "first group of people"?
    Regards
    Wojtek

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    #4

    Re: Do these two expressions mean the same for native speakers?

    I'm not a teacher, and neither I'm a native speaker.

    Let's consider the following example:
    "There are two groups: under 18 and others. For the first class of people we will offer 10% discount".
    My questions are as follow:
    1) In the sentence above, is it allowed to use "first class people" in place of "first class of people" ?
    2) Is my intuition right to say that "first class people" is sort of classifying people into better and worse group, while "first class of people" is neutral and it is like saying "first group of people"?
    Since I'm no native speaker, I will just provide you with the only example of the expression "first class people" that the Codex of Contemporary American English (COCA) listed.

    "We move through the first class cabin. It's the regular mix of first class people: Old money in Gucci enjoying freshly baked cookies, a millionaire in jeans and a T-shirt, business people relaxing after a tough day, and... a very nervous man."
    Last edited by Larkus; 16-Nov-2011 at 20:55.

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    #5

    Re: Do these two expressions mean the same for native speakers?

    Quote Originally Posted by wojtek_himself View Post
    Let's consider the following example:
    "There are two groups: under 18 and others. For the first class of people we will offer 10% discount".
    My questions are as follow:
    1) In the sentence above, is it allowed to use "first class people" in place of "first class of people" ?
    2) Is my intuition right to say that "first class people" is sort of classifying people into better and worse group, while "first class of people" is neutral and it is like saying "first group of people"?
    Regards
    Wojtek
    1. No.
    2. Your intuition is correct. No one likes to be thought of as "second class."

    While you could use "first class of people" in your example, I think I would simply say "group" to avoid any confusion.

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