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  1. Banned
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    #1

    Run

    "The government is running a deficit."
    "The government is running up a deficit."

    Could it be that "running up a deficit" is viewed less favorably than "running a deficit"?

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    #2

    Re: Run

    "Running a deficit" means they have more expenditures than they have revenue.

    "Running up a deficit" would mean they were making an already existing deficit bigger.

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    #3

    Re: Run

    From some reputable magazine:

    "Lately it has run into trouble. Its most recent crisis started when the RSC lost its secondary home in London in 2002 and ran up a deficit of £2.8m, despite a regular subsidy from the Arts Council, a government body."

    Does it mean RSC is increasing its existing deficit of
    £2.8m?

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    #4

    Re: Run

    No, I wouldn't read that that way. Context would help us know whether it is talking about an increase or an absolute measurement.

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    #5

    Re: Run

    More context:

    "MEASURED against the lifespan of the average firm, the Royal Shakespeare Company verges on the venerable. Based in Shakespeare's birthplace in Stratford-upon-Avon, the RSC has operated as a finishing school for British acting and directing talent since it was founded in 1960. Lately it has run into trouble. Its most recent crisis started when the RSC lost its secondary home in London in 2002 and ran up a deficit of £2.8m, despite a regular subsidy from the Arts Council, a government body. Plans to rescue the company included knocking down the main theatre in Stratford and building a “Shakespeare village” on the rubble. That idea was ditched. Next month a less drastic but equally ambitious new plan for the RSC will begin: the company is staging all 38 of Shakespeare's plays in a single season."

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    #6

    Re: Run

    Yes, disregard my first post. "Running up a deficit" means the same thing as "running a deficit."

    I was think of "running up the deficit" which would be increasing an existing deficit.

    Sorry.

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