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  1. vectra's Avatar
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    #1

    go out of one's way

    Hello,

    In a list of idioms we are taking for the next class there is 'to go out of one's way'.
    The definition given in the book of idioms we use is 'to exceed one's power over somebody'.
    Here is an example sentence from the book:
    Nowadays shops have to go out of their way to make customers' shopping experience secure and comfortable.
    As you see there is a complete mismatch between the idiom's definition and the example provided.
    I have consulted a few dictionaries, and here are the results:

    go out of one's way

    Inconvenience oneself or take extra trouble to do something beyond what is required. For example, He went out of his way to introduce me to everyone there , or She went out of her way to be kind . This usage alludes to deviating from one's intended path or normal procedures. [Mid-1700s] - Dictionary.com | Find the Meanings and Definitions of Words at Dictionary.com
    - to make an extra effort
    My aunt went out of her way to help me when I visited her. - www.idiomconnection.com
    My Longman Dictionary Of English Idioms gives this definition and example:
    to make a special effort (to do something):
    Both the Swedes and ourselves are going out of our way to reach an agreement.

    Before alerting the students to the fact, I would like to hear your opinion.

    Thank you for the time and help.
    Last edited by vectra; 21-Nov-2011 at 13:44. Reason: formatting

  2. JohnParis's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: go out of one's way

    There is an error in your book.

    Your definition: "Inconvenience oneself or take extra trouble to do something beyond what is required" is excellent.

    John

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: go out of one's way

    Quote Originally Posted by vectra View Post
    'to exceed one's power over somebody'.
    The definition is wrong. The ones you found in the dictionaries are correct.

  4. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: go out of one's way

    The definition provided by your book is not correct, while the example given is a good one. Your other definitions and examples are also good.

  5. vectra's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: go out of one's way

    I will try to get the students to translate the definition and the example in class, and draw a conclusion. I hope they will notice the difference.
    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    The definition provided by your book is not correct, while the example given is a good one. Your other definitions and examples are also good.

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