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    #1

    salo

    Hello,

    I was aksed the other day what the Eglish word for 'salo' is. The question caught me off guard, and the only thing that came to mind was 'lard'. But unlike lard, salo is not rendered - they are different things actually. I was surprised to find a Wiki article with the title 'salo'. Salo (food) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia It gives some ideas how to explain what this kind of food is, but I'd like to know if I stand a high chance of getting a blank stare from a native English speaker without going into a detalied explanation. Have you ever heard the word?

    Thank you.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: salo

    Quote Originally Posted by Verona_82 View Post
    Have you ever heard the word?
    Not till I read your post.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: salo

    Me neither.

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    #4

    Re: salo

    Nope. You're going to have to explain. "Fatback" would be the closest thing in English, but that isn't brined. Or eaten by people, usually.

  3. Ksenia
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    #5

    Re: salo

    There are always exist some words or special terms which have no exact translation.
    I think it's peculiar to every language.

    For example, let's take one Russian word 'Солянка' (it's a very popular dish in Russia or Ukraine).
    It sounds like 'Solyanka' (Solyanka - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) in English. It is the method of transcribing in translation.
    And I remember once I tried to explain about this dish to a native speaker. He said that Amaricans had similar dish - 'Hodge-Podge' (or 'Hotch-Potch'). But he has never heard about such word as 'Solyanka'.

    Dear Native Speakers, I apologize that I've used Russian on this thread. I just think that it can be some kind of help!

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    #6

    Re: salo

    Thank you all for your replies! I guess I'll go with 'salted fatback' or something like that and hope for maximum understanding.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: salo

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Me neither.
    Nor me. But there are fashions in food words (others too, but especially food).. In '50s England eating yogurt (or 'yoghourt' as it was called at the time) was an insidious revolutionary practice.

    b

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